CONFERENCE AGENDA

A paid conference pass is required to attend these sessions. It can be purchased when you register for the show, or added on to your current registration. Please note that the agenda is subject to change, and additional sessions will be added in the future.

REGISTER HERE About the Conference Agenda PDF

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CERTIFICATIONS: Classes included with purchase of conference pass. Exams require additional fee.

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Monday, May 6, 2024
8:00 AM - 11:30 AM
Room S404d

Advanced Optics for Vision

Stuart Singer, CEO, Schneider Optics, Inc.

Topic(s): Machine Vision, Imaging & Inspection

Designed for the engineering professional, this course concentrates on real-world techniques for putting together optic systems that work. You’ll learn how to select proper lens components, optomechanical layout, including system bends, and mounting techniques. Prior attendance at a Basic Optics course is encouraged, but not required.

Stuart Singer

Stuart Singer

CEO Schneider Optics, Inc.

8:00 AM - 8:45 AM
Room S401cd

Deploying AI to Retrofit Manual and Vision-Guided Robotic Processes in the Automotive Industry

Sina Afrooze, CEO & Co-Founder, Apera AI

Topic(s): AI & Smart Automation Machine Vision, Imaging & Inspection Robotics: Applications, Systems & Innovations

This talk will examine case studies from the automotive industry involving the deployment of artificial intelligence (AI) for vision-guided robotic applications. 

All these projects were retrofits of manual processes performed by operators, robotic processes without vision or cells using conventional vision technologies. We will be joined for the talk by the project participants.

The presenters will cover the following topics:

  • The main driver of process retrofitting—quality and eliminating stops to production.
  • Process and mechanical redesign requirements to use vision systems for robotic guidance.
  • Expected and resulting performance from work cell retrofits.
  • Project teams' learnings, including new skill requirements for implementing vision-guided robotics.
Sina Afrooze

Sina Afrooze

CEO & Co-Founder Apera AI

8:00 AM - 8:45 AM
Room S403a

Designing for Tomorrow’s Cybersecurity Challenges

David Bader, VP of Business Development, Eurotech

Topic(s): AI & Smart Automation Automation Systems, Design & Integration Cybersecurity

In the age of Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) and EdgeAI computing, the landscape of cybersecurity faces unprecedented challenges. Unlike traditional systems, IIoT and EdgeAI compute extend connectivity to a vast array of equipment, field devices, and employee gadgets. This connectivity revolutionizes automation and remote asset management but introduces a labyrinth of security concerns. In this complex realm, our talk delves into three crucial aspects:

Firstly, we analyze the ever-evolving trends in cybersecurity within IIoT and Edge infrastructure. As IIoT adoption grows, so do bad actors looking to compromise the network. 

Secondly, we explore the industry response to these challenges, focusing on the adoption of IIoT cybersecurity requirements and standards at both industry and regional levels. Examining how different sectors tackle these issues provides valuable insights into creating future-proof security frameworks.

Lastly, we investigate the art of crafting a successful, secure solution. This involves a comprehensive review of key security tools that not only maximize user experience but also deliver best-in-class security. Balancing usability with robust protection is a crucial aspect of ensuring IIoT systems remain resilient in the face of evolving threats.

As IIoT and EdgeAI compute continue to reshape the industrial landscape, addressing cybersecurity concerns is imperative. This talk serves as a guide to navigating the complexities of IIoT cybersecurity, offering insights into current trends, industry responses, and the tools necessary for building secure, efficient systems.

David Bader

David Bader

VP of Business Development Eurotech

8:00 AM - 8:45 AM
Room S402a

Developing High Mix Capability Through Open-Source Collaborative Initiatives

Matthew Robinson, ROS-Industrial Consortium Americas Program Manager, Southwest Research Institute

Topic(s): AI & Smart Automation Robotics: Applications, Systems & Innovations

Within the ROS-Industrial Consortium, there has been a development vehicle called Focused Technical Projects (FTPs) which have sought to build out foundational capability at a more application level and demonstrate it through example applications. One of those initiatives has been Robotic Blending, which takes the Scan-N-Plan framework and applies it to surface processing applications. Most recently via a collaboration with the Steel Founders' Society of America, the Robotic Blending Milestone 5 FPT was launched and completed resulting in improvements to open-source tools and a foundational application that may be replicated for additional foundry end-users within their shop environments.

This talk will share the developments and the method for validating, as well as the foundations that were left at a collaboration University to enable them to develop additional capabilities leveraging ROS but ensure they are easily consumed by stakeholders. It is anticipated that additional universities will seek to add the framework to their lab systems to enable furthering component technologies to increase the array of processing that is capable. The foundation is the already open-source scan_n_plan workshop which has been featured in numerous demonstration venues and training workshops and is also available open source for further application development.

Matthew Robinson

Matthew Robinson

ROS-Industrial Consortium Americas Program Manager Southwest Research Institute

8:00 AM - 8:45 AM
Room S401ab

Emerging Trends in Collaborative Automation

Michael DeGrace, UR+ Ecosystem Manager, Universal Robots

Topic(s): Collaborative Robotics Getting Started with Automation

Collaborative robots were pioneered for businesses that had been left behind by traditional robotics. Almost 20 years later, cobots have become the fastest-growing segment of the robotics industry, driven by users who keep finding more areas of production for cobots to add value. Universal Robots even manages an ecosystem of over 400 pre-integrated products designed to put cobots to work across this ever-growing range of tasks and processes. The team overseeing this UR+ ecosystem is obsessed with finding the future of cobots: so what do they see cobots doing in the next 24 to 36 months?

Join Mike DeGrace, UR+ Ecosystem Manager, as he shares the most exciting new technologies and partnerships in the UR+ ecosystem and explores the emerging cobot use cases he sees in the market.

Michael DeGrace

Michael DeGrace

UR+ Ecosystem Manager Universal Robots

8:00 AM - 8:45 AM
Room S402b

Robots Unleashed: Why AMRs Are on the Rise and How AI Will Further Disrupt Production Logistics

Daniel Zindl, Chief Product Officer, Agilox North America

Topic(s): Autonomous Mobile Robotics Logistics & Supply Chain Automation

Daniel Zindl, Chief Product Officer at AGILOX, a leading technology company for AMR solutions, will discuss current market trends and developments in the autonomous mobile robot industry. He will provide insights into how AMRs can enhance manufacturing and warehousing processes for increased efficiency and offer valuable perspectives on successful applications. Furthermore, he will share his outlook on AMR innovations and how simulation-based robot prototyping can accelerate the realization of dark warehouses, potentially faster than initially anticipated. Join Daniel in an engaging speaker session on AMR innovations and discover how smart robot solutions can automate up to 80% of all transportation processes within a facility.

Daniel Zindl

Daniel Zindl

Chief Product Officer Agilox North America

8:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Room S404ab

The Fundamentals of Machine Vision

David Dechow, Owner, Machine Vision Source

Topic(s): Machine Vision, Imaging & Inspection

You’ll learn all the basics, including how images are captured and transferred to the computer, the principles of lighting, and the common processing algorithms used by machine vision systems. Discover how to successfully implement machine vision and how to avoid common pitfalls during the implementation, launch and production phases. This is an ideal training course for people new to machine vision as well as a great refresher course for anyone with machine vision responsibilities.

David Dechow

David Dechow

Owner Machine Vision Source

9:00 AM - 9:45 AM
Grand Ballroom S100

Moneyball: Lessons for Life and Business from Baseball’s Best General Manager

Billy Beane, Former Executive Vice President of the Oakland Athletics

With great insight and signature wit, Beane conveys his innovative, winning style of management and leadership, which involves identifying undervalued assets to create and sustain a competitive advantage. By striking parallels between baseball and business, Beane inspires audiences across industries (including health care, insurance, finance, etc.) with his unforgettable winning underdog story.

Billy Beane

Billy Beane

Former Executive Vice President of the Oakland Athletics

10:15 AM - 11:00 AM
Room S402a

Design For Additive Manufacturing: By A Machine Designer For Machine Builders

Paul DeWys, Sales Engineer, Forerunner 3D Printing

Topic(s): Automation Systems, Design & Integration Emerging Applications in Automation

When I originally started my first company in 2010 it was not in additive, it was a mechanical engineering firm and to this day I still operate that business and we specialize in designing factory automation equipment. For the first 5 years when we were just an engineering firm, I was always keeping an eye on 3D Printing and its capabilities while thinking “Why are we not using this technology to make parts for all the machines we are designing”? The gap I kept finding that separated these two markets was that machine designers/builders did not know what additive technologies were capable of and additive manufacturers did not understand what these machine builders' true needs were (or what they were even trying to do). In 2016 I set out to bridge that gap with the acquisition of our local additive part supplier and the formation of our 3DP business unit. Since that point, my team and I have made it our mission to help educate machine build and automation companies about the potential for additive manufacturing beyond the simple jigs and fixtures.

Paul DeWys

Paul DeWys

Sales Engineer Forerunner 3D Printing

10:15 AM - 11:00 AM
Room S403a

Discovering the Key Factors in Microscope Objective Performance

Rebecca Charboneau, Optical Engineer, Edmund Optics

Topic(s): Machine Vision, Imaging & Inspection

When designing a machine vision system for high-magnification applications, selecting the correct microscope objective is critical. Often, microscope objectives are selected based on their numerical aperture (NA) as this specification is thought to describe the objective’s resolving power; however, this does not tell the whole story. This presentation will go over what defines a microscope objective’s performance and how this can be applied when developing high-magnification machine vision systems.

Rebecca Charboneau

Rebecca Charboneau

Optical Engineer Edmund Optics

10:15 AM - 12:00 PM
Room S401ab

Getting Started with Industrial Robotics

Bob Rochelle, Account Manager, Güdel Inc.

Topic(s): Getting Started with Automation Robotics: Applications, Systems & Innovations

Industrial Robots are the heart of Lean Manufacturing and are vital to the current vibrant manufacturing economy in North America.  The “Getting Started with Robotics” presentation is an introduction to the Industrial Robotics or Flexible Automation Industry.  We will explore Robot-Based Automation Systems to include how the industry functions, why to choose robot-based automation, principles of system integration, general principles of robot technology, the business case for automating and calculating ROI plus the common mistakes made in Robot Integration. The attendees will learn through discussion and evaluating system photos and videos illustrating various robotic-based flexible automation systems.

Bob Rochelle

Bob Rochelle

Account Manager Güdel Inc.

10:15 AM - 11:00 AM
Room S403b

Leveraging UL Robotics Standards Testing to Meet Your Verification & Validation

Jason Smith, Principal Engineer - Commercial Robotics, UL Solutions

Michael Jensen, Product Manager - Industrial Machinery & Automation, UL Solutions

Topic(s): AI & Smart Automation Robotics: Applications, Systems & Innovations

Demonstrating safety to customers and code authorities is key to expanding your business opportunities for robot systems, industrial mobile robots, and commercial robots. Verification and validation are an important foundation for conveying safety to customers and demonstrating enhanced safety testing can be crucial in opening up expanded sales markets in a range of industries, including manufacturing, logistics, and commercial service markets with potential public interaction, such as hospitals, restaurants, delivery and more.

This session will demonstrate how testing to UL robotics standards can help further demonstrate safety for robots, components, and systems, including fire and shock risks, energy & battery system hazards, functional safety, object detection & avoidance, and injury hazards. Learn how testing to UL robotics standards can help complement your A3/RIA verification and validation to open up new business segments and market opportunities for your robotics products.

Jason Smith

Jason Smith

Principal Engineer - Commercial Robotics UL Solutions

Michael Jensen

Michael Jensen

Product Manager - Industrial Machinery & Automation UL Solutions

10:15 AM - 11:00 AM
Room S401cd

Robotic Bin Picking Solutions in Automotive

Will Keller, Senior Manufacturing Engineer, General Motors

Topic(s): Advances in Material Handling Robotics: Applications, Systems & Innovations

We will discuss different types of bin picking, review how we define “does it work”, review examples that we think to work, and highlight what we believe are critical variables and strategies for automated bin picking systems.  Examples will focus on sheet metal parts and assemblies that are common in the automotive industry.

Will Keller

Will Keller

Senior Manufacturing Engineer General Motors

10:15 AM - 11:00 AM
Room S402b

Where Robotics and Medicine Intersect

Robb Colbrunn, Director, BioRobotics Lab, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland Clinic

Topic(s): Emerging Applications in Automation Robotics: Applications, Systems & Innovations

My area of research interest lies where medicine and robotics intersect.  This includes where they currently intersect as well as where they can intersect in the future.  More specifically, as Director of the BioRobotics Lab at the Cleveland Clinic we have created a center of excellence for biomechanical testing of biological structures and biomaterials. Our mission is to employ world-class facilities to allow investigators to conduct high-quality research on the mechanical properties of existing biological structures and constructs, as well as to quantify the potential for new technologies and clinical advancements.  The robotic systems we developed allow researchers to simulate loading conditions on a cadaveric joint by using actuators to simulate muscle forces while simultaneously applying external loads to the joint.  Applications of this type of testing are numerous and can be used to provide insights into orthopedics, joint kinematics, surgical techniques, and disease pathologies. Applications of the enabling technology have benefits in manufacturing.

This session will focus on:

  1. A general overview of our lab and how we are enabling researchers around the world to advance patient care with multi-axis robotic force control
  2. The underlying force control technologies that make this research possible and how they have been shown to have applicability in manufacturing for worker safety and productivity
  3. The key features that robot manufacturers should provide to enable this technology on their platforms
Robb Colbrunn

Robb Colbrunn

Director, BioRobotics Lab, Cleveland Clinic Cleveland Clinic

11:15 AM - 12:00 PM
Room S402b

Event Driven IT/OT Convergence for Smart Manufacturing

Farukh Naqvi, Manufacturing Business Partner, Boston Beer Company

Topic(s): AI & Smart Automation Automation Systems, Design & Integration

The landscape of manufacturing processes is evolving as established standards such as ISA 95 (Process Event Model), ISA 106 (Procedure Model), and ISA 112 (SCADA Standard) transition towards an event-driven paradigm. This shift aims to provide a unified operator experience and augmented capabilities. Advancements in technology platforms for Event Generation, Event Processing, and Event Correlation, bolstered by AI/ML models, are opening up extensive possibilities for IT/OT convergence. This convergence aims to harmonize data, offering a comprehensive operator view of equipment and process performance.

Nevertheless, despite these technological strides, organizational maturity lags. The struggle persists as IT champions digital transformation and IoT with relational database technology, while OT leans towards time series databases for Unit operation PLC/SCADA. This incongruity leads to redundant solutions and a resource-intensive approach, prolonging the achievement of comprehensive automated manufacturing management solutions. Consequently, real-time operator engagement and production management suffer setbacks, culminating in downtime, scrap, and reliance on manual or Excel-based workarounds.

The alignment of IT/OT silos with daily production issues poses a formidable challenge. The proclivity of IT and supply chain professionals toward procedure-centric MES clashes with the inclination of OT/Operations personnel toward machine-centric MES. The inevitable turf battles between IT and OT can be mitigated through an Event-Driven IT/OT convergence production model. While these battles may not be entirely avoided, they can certainly be minimized when all stakeholders rally around a shared Event-Driven IT/OT production model.

The focal point of this presentation is to elucidate the approach of a production model for IT/OT convergence. This model not only addresses the ongoing issues arising from disparate approaches but also strives to pave the way for smoother alignment, reduced conflicts, and enhanced collaboration among stakeholders in pursuit of effective and harmonized manufacturing management.

Farukh Naqvi

Farukh Naqvi

Manufacturing Business Partner Boston Beer Company

11:15 AM - 12:00 PM
Room S403b

Industrial Mobile Robot Safety: A Look at the New 10218

Roberta Nelson Shea, Global Technical Compliance Officer, Universal Robots

Topic(s): Robotics: Applications, Systems & Innovations

Learn about the recent revisions to ISO 10218-1 and ISO 10218-2 and how they affect your operations.

Roberta Nelson Shea

Roberta Nelson Shea

Global Technical Compliance Officer Universal Robots

11:15 AM - 12:00 PM
Room S402a

It Takes A Village: Fostering an Ecosystem to Solve the Biggest Challenges

Florian Pestoni, CEO & Co-founder, InOrbit

Topic(s): Autonomous Mobile Robotics Logistics & Supply Chain Automation

Over the last few years, the robotics landscape has witnessed a remarkable surge in the number of companies entering the field. As a result, end users looking to augment their operations with automation must navigate a complex maze of technologies and work with multiple vendors. Fragmentation within the industry is a problem that hinders the rapid adoption of robotics solutions.

The answer to these challenges is collaboration. In this presentation, InOrbit CEO, Florian Pestoni, will explore the evolving robotics ecosystem and demonstrate how fostering a sense of community at multiple levels can yield significant benefits for all stakeholders. This model will be illustrated by real-world orchestration of autonomous mobile robots (AMRs) from partners such as Mobile Industrial Robots (part of Teradyne), Clearpath/OTTO Motors (part of Rockwell Automation), and Kärcher.

Despite the fears of commoditization from some early market entrants, a thriving ecosystem that supports interoperability is not a zero-sum game. Collaboration across vendors grows the overall market and participants are still free to differentiate. By facilitating the coexistence, coordination, and ultimately collaboration between different robots, the ecosystem can better serve the nearly unbounded need for automation from end users.

But this is not enough. A broader community that encompasses academics, educators, and students at all stages, as well as practitioners and makers, ensures that more talent and, yes, more companies will keep growing the ecosystem. Standards initiatives also play a pivotal role as the industry matures, although progress is slow and these efforts often struggle to keep up with a quickly-changing landscape.

Explore the transformative potential of collaboration in robotics and learn how it is shaping the future of the industry. Together, we will pave the way for a more integrated, accessible, and efficient world of robotics.

Florian Pestoni

Florian Pestoni

CEO & Co-founder InOrbit

11:15 AM - 12:00 PM
Room S403a

Optimizing Automated Material Removal: Safe, Effective, Repeatable

Tucker Sweet, Automation Application Engineer, SCHUNK

Topic(s): Automation Systems, Design & Integration Material Removal, Grinding & Abrasives Robotics: Applications, Systems & Innovations

Material removal is the removal of unwanted material from a workpiece. This is usually done through processes described as deburring, grinding, or polishing. Typically, the material to be removed remains from a previous manufacturing process like turning, milling, welding, etc. This unwanted material can cause interference during assembly operations, increased wear or premature failure on mating parts, safety concerns due to sharp edges and hazardous tasks, poor aesthetics from manufacturing defects, or an increase in corrosion rate. Oftentimes material removal is a step in the manufacturing process that isn’t considered until late in the process. Machine tools are typically large capital investments, but often they are used to do basic material removal functions that can be done outside of the machine improving throughput and reducing cycle time. Automated material removal outside of a machine tool with a robot and some specialty tools can help solve these issues and concerns. 

If a material removal task isn’t being done by a machine tool, oftentimes it is done post-process by humans. Typically, material removal processes are repetitive, dirty, and even dangerous. Doing the same task with sharp or rotating tools repeatedly during a shift is unergonomic and can result in varying output quality throughout a shift. Sometimes the quality variations can be severe enough that workpieces are defective and must be scrapped, resulting in increased manufacturing costs. Automating manual processes results in improved quality and consistency. This is not an easy task due to variations in workpieces, but there are ways to account for these deviations and successfully automate difficult material removal tasks. 

Several methods can be applied to increase success in an automated material removal process. Reducing errors in positioning and locating, increasing measurement capability, and material removal tool compensation can be combined or utilized individually to secure processes. The benefits of automated material removal are clear, but in many manufacturing environments, it has yet to be widely implemented. In this session, we will discuss the opportunities and challenges of automating a material removal process. The audience will learn the different types of material removal and how they can be used to address different defects in workpieces. We will discuss real-world application examples and how different variables can affect the success level of automation integration and the speed at which it is deployed.

Tucker Sweet

Tucker Sweet

Automation Application Engineer SCHUNK

11:15 AM - 12:00 PM
Room S401cd

Simulation and Virtual Commissioning for Discrete Production Systems

Colm Gavin, Portfolio Development Manager, Siemens DI SW

Topic(s): AI & Smart Automation Automation Systems, Design & Integration

Machine and line builders face many challenges today to deliver and integrate discrete production systems. How can they speed up the commissioning of machines? How can unplanned machine behavior be avoided? How can mechanical defects or software errors be detected at an early stage? What can be done to tackle the shortage of skilled workers & the decreasing willingness to travel?
In this session learn how you can shorten machine commissioning time at the end customer’s site, secure project timeline due to validation of the mechanical design and processes in the virtual space, reduce stress levels at the real commissioning with already tested software, and reduce the risk of real damage with collision detection on the digital twin. With Siemens's comprehensive digital twin solutions, we can simulate and virtually commission all relevant parts of a machine, such as mechanical components, electrical device behavior, and automation software.

Colm Gavin

Colm Gavin

Portfolio Development Manager Siemens DI SW

12:30 PM - 2:30 PM
Room S404d

Advanced Vision Lighting

Steven King, Product Manager, Omron

Topic(s): Machine Vision, Imaging & Inspection

The advanced lighting session will dive deeper into the main machine vision lighting principles of  illumination, reflection, emission, absorption and transmission and how these can be exploited to create high contrast images for inspection and code reading. The course will go through the fundamental concepts in greater detail, and then through the more advanced concepts of color, multi-light, photometric stereo and multispectral imaging, detailing all from both the theoretical and practical viewpoints.

Steven King

Steven King

Product Manager Omron

1:30 PM - 2:15 PM
Room S401cd

Automating Warehousing and Logistics

Jean-Pierre Hathout, President Mobile Industrial Robots, Mobile Industrial Robots

Topic(s): Autonomous Mobile Robotics Logistics & Supply Chain Automation

TBA

Jean-Pierre Hathout

Jean-Pierre Hathout

President Mobile Industrial Robots Mobile Industrial Robots

1:30 PM - 5:00 PM
Room S404ab

Beginning Optics for Machine Vision

Nicholas Sischka, Director, Imaging, Edmund Optics

Topic(s): Machine Vision, Imaging & Inspection

This course teaches the fundamentals for optics for machine vision and robotics. Students will learn the fundamental parameters of an imaging system and why they are important, as well as how to choose a lens using first order parameters. The course then teaches the concept and real-world applicability of the modulation transfer function (MTF) and how to manipulate an MTF with different variables to change things such as the depth of field. Lastly, the course will introduce telecentric lenses and how they are different from more traditional imaging optics. 

Nicholas Sischka

Nicholas Sischka

Director, Imaging Edmund Optics

1:30 PM - 12:15 PM
Room S402b

Demystifying AI: Tangible Solutions for Today's Manufacturing Challenges

Eric Danziger, CEO & Co-Founder, Invisible AI

Topic(s): AI & Smart Automation Machine Vision, Imaging & Inspection

"Demystifying AI: Tangible Solutions for Today's Manufacturing Challenges" is a session tailored for industry leaders seeking immediate, practical applications of AI and Computer Vision technology on the factory floor. In today's manufacturing landscape, faced with extreme labor shortages, getting more done with less is paramount. This session highlights how AI and Computer Vision can play a pivotal role in enhancing production and throughput despite challenges with understaffing and high turnover rates.

Computer Vision and AI empowers operators to swiftly identify and rectify production bottlenecks, ensuring that resources are utilized efficiently. With video and real-time data, paired with AI insights, manufacturers can identify outlier cycles, missed steps, and root causes of line stoppages, maximizing output with minimal resources. Processes that would have taken hours or days or would be lost in the moment can be done in minutes with AI and Computer Vision.

However, embracing this transformative technology requires a strategic approach. Change management is a critical factor in successful adoption. Companies must view the integration of AI and Computer Vision as an organizational change rather than a standalone solution. This session provides valuable insights and practical strategies to navigate this transition, ensuring that companies can fully capitalize on the potential of these technologies.

Eric Danziger

Eric Danziger

CEO & Co-Founder Invisible AI

1:30 PM - 2:30 PM
Room S403b

From Funding to Impact: How ARM Institute Projects Strengthen U.S. Manufacturing

Larry Sweet, Director, Engineering, ARM Institute

Topic(s): Autonomous Mobile Robotics

In this session, you’ll hear from subject matter experts who have taken their ARM Institute projects from funding to real-impact on U.S. manufacturing. You’ll walk away from this session with an understanding of advancements catalyzed by the ARM Institute, how you can become involved, best practices for projects that bridge the gaps between industry, government, and academia, and more.

Larry Sweet

Larry Sweet

Director, Engineering ARM Institute

1:30 PM - 2:15 PM
Room S402a

Simplicity and Innovation: Designing Small Automated Systems

Drew Cunningham, Business Development Manager, AutoStore

Topic(s): Automation Systems, Design & Integration Getting Started with Automation

How to design a scalable solution that can match your sustained growth and revenue without investing significant capital.

Drew Cunningham

Drew Cunningham

Business Development Manager AutoStore

1:30 PM - 2:15 PM
Room S401ab

Successful Automation Strategies: Fast, Wide Scale Implementation for Small or Global Organizations

Jerry Perez, Executive Director - Global Accounts, FANUC America Corporation

Topic(s): Getting Started with Automation Robotics: Applications, Systems & Innovations The Business Of Automation

Many automation plans and roadmaps either lose steam, focus, fail to return on investments, or all of the above. 

Whether you already have an automation roadmap, or you know you need to create one, this session will give you in-depth insights into what has a strategy succeed, and what are pitfalls you need to avoid. 

Strategy topics will include:

  • Stakeholder Engagement
  • CapEx Planning
  • Standard Specifications and Data Organization
  • Integrator Selection
  • Workforce Development
  • Importance of an Automation Opportunity Matrix
  • And more!

Do you have a roadmap?  Are you as far along on your automation plan as planned?  Are you getting the return that you promised?  How to select your integrator?  Where do you start?

Start your automation journey with a clear path forward to the fastest, plant or companywide implementation possible.

Jerry Perez

Jerry Perez

Executive Director - Global Accounts FANUC America Corporation

1:30 PM - 2:15 PM
Room S403a

Which 3D Imaging Technique Is Right for You?

Boris Duché, Product Manager, IDS Imaging Development Systems GmbH

Topic(s): Automation Systems, Design & Integration Machine Vision, Imaging & Inspection

Prepare to delve deep into the world of 3D technology through this comprehensive seminar dedicated to the science of depth sensing. We will focus on two distinct techniques — active-stereo vision and time-of-flight (TOF) — that form the backbone of modern 3D imaging. This seminar aims to equip you with a foundation of knowledge that can be integrated into your automation applications.

We will begin by examining the fundamental principles behind each technique to provide an understanding of how these technologies operate, setting the stage for informed decision-making. Every technology possesses its unique strengths and inherent limitations. Through a comparative analysis, we will shine a spotlight on these aspects of each of the two techniques. By the end of our exploration, you'll possess an awareness of the situations where active-stereo vision and TOF cameras excel, as well as the scenarios that may present challenges.

You will gain a holistic view of the impact of 3D imaging on various industries as we explore real-world success stories where these technologies have been used to achieve remarkable results. Explore the cutting-edge advancements and emerging technologies that are poised to shape the landscape of automation and beyond. By the end of this session, you will possess the knowledge and confidence to make informed decisions when selecting the most suitable 3D technology for your automation applications.

Boris Duché

Boris Duché

Product Manager IDS Imaging Development Systems GmbH

2:30 PM - 3:15 PM
Room S401ab

How Their First Robot Purchase Enabled A 70-Year-Old Company with 11 Facilities on 3 Continents to Profitably Expand Their Domestic Manufacturing

Patrick Varley, Product Marketing Manager, Robotics, Mitsubishi Electric Automation Inc

Topic(s): Automation Systems, Design & Integration Getting Started with Automation Robotics: Applications, Systems & Innovations

World Wide Fittings, Inc. is a 70-year-old company that manufactures steel and stainless steel hydraulics fittings in 11 facilities spanning 3 continents. When supply chain issues made getting parts from their Asian facilities impractical, Illinois-based manufacturer World Wide Fittings, Inc (WWF) needed to increase their domestic manufacturing capability while maintaining a high level of productivity and quality.  Increasing domestic output would lessen the impact of the supply chain issues, but domestic production had to do more than just shorten delivery times:  The facilities had to achieve a high level of productivity and efficiency to stay competitive.  Fortunately for them, the answer was just across from their parking lot.

While there were numerous processes that they could start with, WWF started with a straightforward project to automate the loading and unloading of one of their CNC lathes. They opted for a complete turn-key system including the robot, gripper/end effector, controls, an HMI, and safety.  The results exceeded expectations:  in addition to the automation of the load/unload process, machine utilization increased from 70% to 95%.  The system featured storage for 4 hours of incoming parts as well as the same amount for the storage of completed parts.  This enabled the lathe to run unattended through breaks and beyond the end of the typical workday.  WWF is expecting a Return on Investment of less than 24 months.  Due to the success of this project, WWF is looking to automate similar processes within their facilities and increase their U.S.-based manufacturing.  Per Sean McCarthy, President/Owner of World Wide Fittings: “Bottom line, they’re helping us expand our domestic manufacturing and keep it at a competitive level.  That’s good for us, good for our employees, and good for the country.”

This session will go through the process of how WWF, Mitsubishi Electric Automation, and SCADAware worked together to identify and evaluate candidate applications, determine which one to start with, and customize the design to meet the goals and ROI requirements that WWF needed to cost justify the project.

Patrick Varley

Patrick Varley

Product Marketing Manager, Robotics Mitsubishi Electric Automation Inc

2:30 PM - 3:15 PM
Room S403a

Leveraging AI in Manufacturing and Logistics

Kevin Jones, VP of Sales, OnLogic

Michael Kleiner, VP Edge AI Solutions, OnLogic

Topic(s): AI & Smart Automation Automation Systems, Design & Integration Logistics & Supply Chain Automation

AI has been top of mind for every business for over a year now, but how do we bring the rapid advancement of technology to practical applications on the manufacturing floor and fulfillment center?

OnLogic is a leading provider of Edge Hardware and AI solutions. We work closely with our customers and partners to reinvent our customer’s workflows and make their operations more efficient. In this presentation, we will review several examples focusing primarily on the manufacturing and logistics industry to illustrate how AI can be utilized to drive automation to the next level.

Kevin Jones

Kevin Jones

VP of Sales OnLogic

Michael Kleiner

Michael Kleiner

VP Edge AI Solutions OnLogic

2:30 PM - 3:15 PM
Room S401cd

The Rise of the Advanced Manufacturing Team and DIY Industrial Automation

Etienne Lacroix, CEO & Co-Founder, Vention

Topic(s): Automation Systems, Design & Integration The Business Of Automation

For the past 30 years, industrial automation has undergone relatively few changes to the way automation is designed and deployed. Traditional automation technology was developed (and priced) for high-throughput manufacturing, making it most accessible to those who could afford complex, custom integration services. This left small and medium-sized businesses, the ones who would benefit from the democratization of automation, behind.

Over the past year, Vention has done extensive research on the impact that recent innovations, specifically the platforming of industrial automation, have had on the industry. We found that small and medium-sized businesses that were previously hindered by capital investment barriers are now leading the charge in adopting the Manufacturing Automation Platform (MAP) and do-it-yourself (DIY) automation because of their accessibility and low barrier to entry. The result? More manufacturers are leveraging their internal resources to create the Advanced Manufacturing Team.

Supported by intuitive and easy-to-use technology, Advanced Manufacturing Teams are built to drive the industrial automation roadmap across manufacturing plants, regrouping expertise in mechanical design, industrial control, and robotics into one team. Instead of relying on external engineering service firms, these teams embrace DIY industrial automation technologies and resources within MAP, such as user forums and an e-commerce website, alongside easier-to-use industrial automation components, to develop deep process knowledge and deploy self-designed automated solutions themselves.

This session will dive into Vention’s research on DIY automation and the Advanced Manufacturing Team. The research spans over one year and looks at manufacturers from small to enterprise size, and across 17 different industries to create a holistic view of manufacturer adoption patterns of DIY automation.

Etienne Lacroix

Etienne Lacroix

CEO & Co-Founder Vention

2:40 PM - 3:45 PM
Room S403b

Strategies for Making Advanced Robotic Manufacturing Technology Accessible to System Integrators and End Users:

Larry Sweet, Director, Engineering, ARM Institute

Topic(s): Robotics: Applications, Systems & Innovations

Robotics technology providers can’t operate in a bubble. Ensuring that robotics innovations can be easily adopted and integrated by manufacturers of all sizes is critical. Join this session to better understand the opportunities and challenges (both business and technical) that come with making robotics technology more accessible, learn about best practices, hear from subject matter experts who are working on this issue, and join an interactive discussion on possible solutions.

Larry Sweet

Larry Sweet

Director, Engineering ARM Institute

3:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Room S404d

Advanced Camera & Image Sensor Technology

Steve Kinney, Director of Training, Smart Vision Lights

Topic(s): Machine Vision, Imaging & Inspection

Explore the different levels of image quality at the sensor level.  Details relating to quantum efficiency, dark noise, signal to noise ratio will be discussed in detail.  In addition to topics related to area scan cameras, the proper usage of line scan and TDI cameras will be reviewed. Sensor size classification and relationship to the camera’s lens mount will be covered.

Steve Kinney

Steve Kinney

Director of Training Smart Vision Lights

3:00 PM - 4:15 PM
Room S401cd

The Future of Warehouse Robotics is Mobile and Multi-Use

Mukesh Ranjan, Vice President of Product, Dexterity

Topic(s): Advances in Material Handling Logistics & Supply Chain Automation Robotics: Applications, Systems & Innovations

To realize the full potential of warehouse automation, new robots need to be flexible to handle multiple tasks at multiple sites in the warehouse. Palletizing, depalletizing, truck loading, truck unloading - how can one robot handle it all?

Join us as we discuss how new approaches in AI, reinforcement learning, and sensing combine with classic controls to make off-the-shelf robot hardware capable of tackling some of the most complex challenges in material handling. Rather than waiting for the next generation of robots, let's help robotic hardware gain new skills at the speed of software.

Mukesh Ranjan

Mukesh Ranjan

Vice President of Product Dexterity

3:30 PM - 4:15 PM
Room S402a

An Introduction to Automation: Working with Systems Integrators

Adam Crandall, Chief Revenue Officer, Addtronics

Topic(s): Automation Systems, Design & Integration Getting Started with Automation

In today's rapidly evolving industrial landscape, automation has transcended from a mere technological advancement to a strategic imperative. The transformative potential of automation is undeniable, promising increased operational efficiency, reduced costs, enhanced product quality, and heightened competitiveness. Yet, for many organizations, the path to automation remains unclear.

In this comprehensive session, you will gain a profound understanding of automation's transformative power, the crucial role of systems integrators, and how to strategically navigate the automation journey. Whether you're new to automation or a seasoned professional, these insights will empower you to harness automation's full potential and drive success in an ever-evolving industrial landscape.

Adam Crandall

Adam Crandall

Chief Revenue Officer Addtronics

3:30 PM - 4:15 PM
Room S402b

Modern Backup Strategies to Minimize Risk and Maximize Efficiency

Adam Gluck, Founder & CEO, Copia Automation

Topic(s): AI & Smart Automation Automation Systems, Design & Integration

In the contemporary industrial landscape, safeguarding control data through robust backup strategies is of paramount importance. While IT departments have long prioritized business data backups, the intricate manufacturing environment is often heavily reliant on workers physically connecting PCs to PLCs with backups not happening on a regular and consistent basis. Even with these manual processes to backup machines and devices, in addition to diverse automation programs, there is no way to know if code was changed, when, why, or by whom, leading to vulnerabilities in the system.

By contrast, modern backup solutions eliminate these manual and tedious tasks. More importantly, these solutions enable the visualization of code that is running on the plant floor and provide visual comparisons to previous versions. Custom alerts to popular business apps, such as Slack and Jira, can be sent when changes are detected, and automatic backups can be scheduled and run on demand. This superior visibility and control accelerate troubleshooting and maintenance to help prevent downtime and recover quickly when it occurs.

This presentation will explore the risks and challenges of current backup practices, and provide modern solutions that provide automated backups and additional benefits.

Adam Gluck

Adam Gluck

Founder & CEO Copia Automation

3:30 PM - 4:15 PM
Room S401ab

No One Does It Alone: What It Takes to Make a Partnership Work in Robotic Abrasive Processing

Topic(s): Material Removal, Grinding & Abrasives Robotics: Applications, Systems & Innovations

TBA

3:30 PM - 4:15 PM
Room S403a

Stereo Imaging Use Cases and Challenges for Warehouse Robotic Applications

Stephen Se, Senior Engineering Manager, Depth Sensing, Teledyne FLIR - Machine Vision

Topic(s): Logistics & Supply Chain Automation Machine Vision, Imaging & Inspection Robotics: Applications, Systems & Innovations

Depth perception is a requirement for various warehouse robotic applications such as autonomous navigation, pick & place and palletizing. The common methods to achieve depth perception are stereo, time-of-flight, and lidar.

In this talk, we will discuss the following:

  1. Trade-offs between 3D vision technologies for robotic applications,
  2. Stereo imaging and its key design drivers,
  3. Use cases of deploying stereo imaging in various warehouse robotic applications, and
  4. Common challenges in real-world scenarios and tactics to tackle them.
Stephen Se

Stephen Se

Senior Engineering Manager, Depth Sensing Teledyne FLIR - Machine Vision

Tuesday, May 7, 2024
8:00 AM - 10:00 AM
Room S404d

3D Vision System Development

James Anderson, Digital Business Consultant - Vision and Quality Control, SICK

Topic(s): Machine Vision, Imaging & Inspection

Learn how advancements in 3-D camera technology are enabling new solutions for more applications than ever before.  Review the many vision-based 3-D measurement techniques and which achieve the best results for different application scenarios. This session will provide real application techniques you can use in electronics, pharmaceutical, food & beverage, aerospace, automotive and many other industries.”

James Anderson

James Anderson

Digital Business Consultant - Vision and Quality Control SICK

8:00 AM - 8:45 AM
Room S402b

Avoiding the Major Pitfalls of Machine Vision Lighting

Lindsey Sullivan, Technical Marketing Manager, CCS America

Topic(s): Getting Started with Automation Machine Vision, Imaging & Inspection

If you’ve ever had to select lighting for a machine vision application, you know that the wrong lighting can derail a project. By the time you realize, you have to spend extra on redesign and leave your customers hanging with an uncertain delivery window.

The pitfalls that lead to engineer's improper lighting are rooted in 5 key misconception "themes":

  1. Considering the vision portion too late
  2. Scope and scope creep
  3. Samples and machine environment conditions
  4. Previous application experience
  5. Seeing versus detecting defects

Knowing what causes applications to get derailed and delayed means those mistakes can be avoided and projects can be successful with the right lighting solution.

We'll explore what the incorrect assumptions are, why they are incorrect, and what to do instead.

Lindsey Sullivan

Lindsey Sullivan

Technical Marketing Manager CCS America

8:00 AM - 10:30 AM
Room S404ab

Beginning Lighting for Machine Vision

Neil Farrow, Machine Vision Applications Engineer, Datasensing

Topic(s): Machine Vision, Imaging & Inspection

This course focuses on providing the attendee with a background and a basic set of tools to apply a more rigorous analytical approach to solving lighting applications.  Topics covered include overview of light, lighting geometry and structure, color tools, filters - illustrated by examples and graphics.  We also briefly address LED technology, safety, radiant power measurements, illuminator strobing and preview advanced lighting non-visible and geometry techniques.

Neil Farrow

Neil Farrow

Machine Vision Applications Engineer Datasensing

8:00 AM - 8:45 AM
Room S402a

Eliminating Drift and Hallucinations in Generative AI with RAG AI

Christopher Hoemeke, Global Account Manager, Rockwell Automation, Inc.

Topic(s): AI & Smart Automation Automation Systems, Design & Integration

There is no shortage of articles and use cases on Generative AI but how do you eliminate the hallucinations and drift of your generative AI in your LLMs?

AI models don’t “know” anything in a human sense. They are trained on large datasets and use statistical analysis to identify patterns and make predictions based on those patterns. When an AI model is asked a question, it uses its training data to identify patterns in the question and generate a response that is most likely to follow from those patterns. While an AI model may not “understand” a question in the way that humans do, it can still generate responses based on statistical analysis.” Even the most well-trained and unbiased AI models can drift if their training doesn’t align with incoming data. If model drift isn’t detected and mitigated quickly, it can lead to a negative business impact. 

The dangers of data management within generative AI are well documented, just read about Samsung’s big oops but how do you overcome this cognitive dissonance from generative AI?

The newest methodology for dealing with this issue is Retrieval Augmented Generation (RAG). Retrieval Augmented Generation (RAG) is a technique that enhances the capabilities of language models by combining the power of pre-trained language models with the ability to retrieve and use external information.  RAG AI bridges the critical gap between static knowledge of LLMs and the needs of the manufacturing environment. 

RAG AI has access to current information sources, ensuring that responses are both logical and grounded. RAG can be particularly useful when dealing with unstructured data, such as repositories of manuals, PDFs, production reports, and other documents. It allows users to find accurate answers to questions based on existing sources of internal documents. This keeps the AI grounded in actual, pertinent current knowledge. Because they have been condensed from pre-vetted and reliable sources. Unlike LLMs, which require lengthy retraining to update their knowledge, RAG's internal knowledge may be changed effortlessly without completely revamping the system thanks to the interaction between retrieval and generation. This phase makes sure that the information used to construct the subsequent answer is both correct and contextually meaningful. The original query and its final data subset are then loaded into a Large Language Model (LLM). 

And this is what makes RAG AI unique. The LLM can produce a response that is linguistically sound and based on the most recent and accurate data because to the augmented contextual prompt.

Christopher Hoemeke

Christopher Hoemeke

Global Account Manager Rockwell Automation, Inc.

8:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Room S401ab

Introduction to Industrial AI for Automation

Kence Anderson, CEO & Co-Founder, Composabl, Inc.

Topic(s): AI & Smart Automation Getting Started with Automation

Artificial Intelligence (AI) promises better, more human-like decision-making and more autonomous operation, yet 87% of machine learning models never make it to production. The disconnect between AI technologists (IT) and industrial stakeholders (OT, from executive to the plant floor) significantly drives this failure. This disconnect shows itself as a lack of common understanding of AI capabilities, lack of common terminology to discuss AI solutions, and no framework for discussing AI Automation at various organizational altitudes.

The audience for this course is industrial stakeholders that own and operate industrial processes. This includes business executives, innovation teams, plant / line managers, process engineers, controls engineers, line supervisors, and industrial data scientists. We will provide a 101-level introduction that helps industrial stakeholders like you navigate the confusing AI landscape. The course arms will arm you with context that helps you select technologies, service providers, and vendors that will help you improve your manufacturing and logistics process control. The result is the foundation of building AI-powered automation that passes the ethics, explainability, and trust criteria needed to reach production and significant return on investment.

The course has been designed and will be presented by Kence Anderson, AI author and start-up founder, formerly with Microsoft Bonsai. 

COURSE OUTLINE:

  • How Machines Make Decisions
  • How AI Can Improve Industrial Automation
  • AI for Perception: How Machine Learning Helps You Understand What's Happening
  • AI for Taking Action: Reinforcement Learning Decides What to Do
  • Deploying AI-Powered Automation
  • Capstone Exercise
Kence Anderson

Kence Anderson

CEO & Co-Founder Composabl, Inc.

8:00 AM - 8:45 AM
Room S401cd

Machine Learning Applied to Robotics Product Development and Standardization

Gianpiero Negri, Senior Risk Manager - Robotics Safety, Amazon

Topic(s): AI & Smart Automation Logistics & Supply Chain Automation Robotics: Applications, Systems & Innovations

The goal of this speech is to provide an introduction to Amazon Mechatronics and Sustainable Packaging (part of Amazon Global Robotics) organizational structure and scope, and to provide an overview of some main AI/ML potential applications to Mechatronics Product Development process, with a main focus on the safety and compliance/standardization aspects, available norms and policies, and what’s outstanding to tackle the future technical and operational challenges in complex manufacturing and logistics environment.

Gianpiero Negri

Gianpiero Negri

Senior Risk Manager - Robotics Safety Amazon

8:00 AM - 8:45 AM
Room S403a

Risk Reduction Is Not Always About Changing Your Control System

Jenny Tuertscher, Vice President Technical Safety, Fortress Safety

Topic(s): Automation Safety Automation Systems, Design & Integration

When evaluating machinery safety, doing a risk assessment is the first step. When a risk that is not acceptable is identified, risk reduction measures are selected to reduce that risk to an acceptable level. Some machines may not have control systems that are compatible with the latest and greatest engineering controls technologies used to reduce risk. What happens in these cases? It might be possible to make the machines safer without running into technology implementation issues.  Approaches such as ensuring a process is followed as documented or ensuring only authorized personnel are performing tasks may reduce the risk to an acceptable level.

Join us to see case studies where the identified risk is reduced using approaches that do not require a complete machine control system upgrade or the latest high-end technologies.  And of course, we will link the case studies to the relevant machinery safety standards as we show how the risks within the applications were reduced.

Jenny Tuertscher

Jenny Tuertscher

Vice President Technical Safety Fortress Safety

9:00 AM - 10:00 AM
Room S405a

Basic Machine Design and the Physics of Motion

Topic(s): Motion Control & Conveyance Motors & Drives

Introduction to basic machine design concepts and physics behind electro-mechanical motion control.

10:00 AM - 11:00 AM
Room S405a

Mechanical Motion Control Components and Subsystems

Keith Knight, Market Development Manager, Celera Motion - a division of Novanta

Topic(s): Motion Control & Conveyance Motors & Drives

Introduction to what a typical motion control system consists of and the typical mechanical components and subsystems it contains.

Keith Knight

Keith Knight

Market Development Manager Celera Motion - a division of Novanta

10:15 AM - 11:00 AM
Room S402b

Automated Manufacturing Scale Up: Planning for Success

Chris Knorr, Vice President, Business Development North America, Eclipse Automation, Part of Accenture

Topic(s): Automation Systems, Design & Integration Getting Started with Automation The Business Of Automation

Many manufacturers launching new products are challenged with how to scale their manufacturing operations, with capital equipment investment being a major consideration.
With new products and new processes, come several challenges that are not as prominent in steady-state, mature product manufacturing.

There are many more risks and unknowns, but with some planning and thought around some of those risks, they can be mitigated to enable a successful manufacturing ramp-up.
In this session, I will share some of the considerations for manufacturing scale-up. We’ll talk about some best practices and pitfalls I have seen from the perspective of an automated equipment builder.

Topics Include:

  • Considerations for Implementing a Phased Ramp-Up Plan
  • Automation Concept Development 
  • Mitigation of New Automated Process Risks
  • Considerations for Autonomous Operation
  • Use of Digital Twin Technologies
  • Early Planning of Data Architectures
  • Planning Transition to Operations
Chris Knorr

Chris Knorr

Vice President, Business Development North America Eclipse Automation, Part of Accenture

10:15 AM - 11:00 AM
Room S403a

Autonomous Mobile Robots in Healthcare

Chris Tourney, Innovation Engineer, Mayo Clinic

Topic(s): Autonomous Mobile Robotics Emerging Applications in Automation

Agenda:

  • Why Robots? Why now?
  • Evolution of Technology
  • Robotic Use Cases
  • Deploying Robotics
  • Efforts Underway
  • Robot Ecosystem/Operations/Fleet Management 
  • Discussion Q&A
Chris Tourney

Chris Tourney

Innovation Engineer Mayo Clinic

10:15 AM - 12:00 PM
Room S401cd

Getting Started with Mobile Robotics

Robert Bollinger, Owner, Dynamic Horizons Automation Solutions LLC

Topic(s): Autonomous Mobile Robotics Getting Started with Automation

Mobility is becoming an important part of many integrated manufacturing systems and logistics solutions. This session explores the opportunities created when adding autonomous mobility to your automation menu. We will discuss the key items to consider and pitfalls to avoid when choosing and deploying IMR systems.

Robert Bollinger

Robert Bollinger

Owner Dynamic Horizons Automation Solutions LLC

10:15 AM - 11:00 AM
Room S402a

Machine Vision Made Simple

Eric Hershberger, Principal Application Engineer, Cognex

Topic(s): Getting Started with Automation Machine Vision, Imaging & Inspection

This will be an interesting talk describing the top 10 tips and tricks that I have used over a long career to make integrating machine vision simpler. I will discuss PLC logic, the use of standard templates, and working with applications people to identify pain points and problems with your machine vision integration. I will include real-world applications and dive into a few of the items that I use in my day job to solve customer applications and make their integration life easier. I will showcase the tools and equipment that can be used to make your machine vision application work for a long time.

Eric Hershberger

Eric Hershberger

Principal Application Engineer Cognex

10:30 AM - 12:30 PM
Room S404d

Introduction to Machine Learning

Andrew Long, CEO, Cyth Systems

Topic(s): Machine Vision, Imaging & Inspection

Intro to Machine Learning

Andrew Long

Andrew Long

CEO Cyth Systems

11:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Room S405a

Understanding Inertia and Reflected Inertia

Keith Knight, Market Development Manager, Celera Motion - a division of Novanta

Topic(s): Motion Control & Conveyance Motors & Drives

The importance of inertia in electro-mechanical motion control systems and how the inertia of the components in a motion control system affects its performance.

Keith Knight

Keith Knight

Market Development Manager Celera Motion - a division of Novanta

11:15 AM - 12:00 PM
Room S402a

Improve Uptime and Save Money – Getting Started with Condition Monitoring

Tom Knauer, Global Strategy Manager - Robotics & Automation, Balluff GmbH

Topic(s): AI & Smart Automation Automation Systems, Design & Integration

Condition monitoring and predictive maintenance are “hot topics” in factory automation. However many facilities still use preventative maintenance or “run to fail” approaches. Moving to a condition monitoring or predictive maintenance approach can be intimidating, concerns include:

  • Perception that it’s expensive
  • Disruption to existing controls architecture and machinery
  • Technology seems challenging
  • Don’t know where to start

So why should manufacturers implement condition monitoring or predictive maintenance?

  • Global trends, competition, and customer demands place increasing pressure on manufacturers to improve Overall Equipment Effectiveness (OEE) and reduce unplanned downtime.
  • Only 20% of equipment failures are age-related and addressed by preventative maintenance.
  • The number and range of solutions are growing, and the cost is dropping.
  • Many solutions are scalable – start small, learn what works/doesn’t work, then deploy more broadly and more.
  • Recent innovations are easy to “add on” to legacy or new equipment and minimize the impact on controls architecture and machinery.

It can be easier to get started by gaining a basic understanding of:

  • The stages of machine failure
  • The related indicators
  • The connection to the four maintenance approaches
  • The cost-benefit tradeoffs

I’ll give an overview of these key topics, and will then provide some advice and processes on how to get started with condition monitoring and predictive maintenance.

Tom Knauer

Tom Knauer

Global Strategy Manager - Robotics & Automation Balluff GmbH

11:15 AM - 12:00 PM
Room S403a

No-Code Robot Programing for End Users: Simplifying Automation

Ross Diankov, CEO, Mujin

Topic(s): AI & Smart Automation Robotics: Applications, Systems & Innovations

In today's rapidly evolving industrial landscape, automation is the key to efficiency and competitiveness. However, the traditionally complex process of programming industrial robots has often been a barrier for end users seeking to harness its potential. This presentation explores a revolutionary approach to automation that empowers end users to take control.

We delve into the world of no-code robot programming, which eliminates the need for intricate coding skills. Through user-friendly interfaces and intuitive tools, attendees will discover how end users can easily design, customize, and deploy robotic automation solutions tailored to their specific needs.

Join us to explore the tangible benefits of this approach, including increased productivity, reduced downtime, and enhanced adaptability in the face of changing production demands. Real-world case studies and demonstrations will showcase the practical applications of no-code programming, making it clear that automation is no longer limited to the realm of specialists.

Whether you are a seasoned automation professional or new to the field, this presentation promises valuable insights into simplifying automation, making it accessible to all end users. Leave equipped with the knowledge and inspiration to harness the power of robotics, drive operational efficiency, and propel your organization forward in an increasingly automated world.

Ross Diankov

Ross Diankov

CEO Mujin

11:15 AM - 12:00 PM
Room S402b

The Future of Manufacturing for Assembly Automation

Kevin Mauger, President, Glide-Line

Topic(s): Motion Control & Conveyance The Business Of Automation

Manufacturing has been forced to take some big leaps in recent history to keep up with changing consumer demands, labor shortages, and supply chain issues, but also customers demanding ultimate flexibility and speed to keep up with both current and future operations. The new world for manufacturers has created both new opportunities and obstacles that we are all learning to navigate. There are three topics we will address, three areas of business our team has successfully navigated thus far, albeit, with many lessons learned along the way. I'll be diving into:

  • Flexibility (automation, conveyance & navigating supply chain disruptions)
  • Agility and Speed (addressing labor constraints)
  • Customer Experience 

From the point of view of what we've all had to overcome in recent years and how that translates into creating The Future of Manufacturing for us all.

Kevin Mauger

Kevin Mauger

President Glide-Line

1:30 PM - 3:15 PM
Room S401ab

Advances in AI-Powered Machine Vision Inspection

Arye Barnehama, CEO, Elementary

Ed Goffin, Vice President, Product Marketing, Pleora Technologies

Eric Hershberger, Principal Application Engineer, Cognex

Gareth Powell, Product Director, Prophesee

Rajesh Iyengar, Co-Founder and CEO, Lincode Labs Inc.

Topic(s): AI & Smart Automation Machine Vision, Imaging & Inspection

In today's rapidly evolving industrial landscape, the convergence of artificial intelligence and machine vision has opened up a world of opportunities. From improving quality control and enhancing safety protocols to optimizing production processes and increasing efficiency, AI-powered machine vision is revolutionizing the way manufacturing and industrial production operate. Join us for this discussion with industry experts that will shed light on the latest trends, real-world use cases, and best practices that are driving these transformative technology:

Closing the Loop on Quality Using AI-Powered Vision and Analytics
Ayre Barnehama, Elementary

Your First Steps to AI Automation
Ed Goffin, Pleora Technologies

Why AI Wins the Inspection Race for High-Speed Factory Automation
Eric Hershberger, Cognex

Revolutionizing Machine Vision: Harnessing Event-Based Vision for Industrial Automation Systems
Gareth Powell, Prophesee

Smart Visual Quality Inspection with Artificial Intelligence
Rajesh Iyengar, Lincode Labs

Arye Barnehama

Arye Barnehama

CEO Elementary

Ed Goffin

Ed Goffin

Vice President, Product Marketing Pleora Technologies

Eric Hershberger

Eric Hershberger

Principal Application Engineer Cognex

Gareth Powell

Gareth Powell

Product Director Prophesee

Rajesh Iyengar

Rajesh Iyengar

Co-Founder and CEO Lincode Labs Inc.

1:30 PM - 3:00 PM
Room S404d

Designing Linescan Vision Systems

Dale Deering, Senior Director, Business Development, Teledyne

Topic(s): Machine Vision, Imaging & Inspection

In this course, you learn about Line-scan imaging, and how using a scanning technique can be beneficial for efficient image capture of moving objects.  Topics cover components for line-scan image acquisition, when to use line-scan, how to achieve optimum results, and trends in the industry. When you complete this course, you will be able to recognize candidate applications for line-scan imaging and understand how to develop and implement line-scan solutions.

Dale Deering

Dale Deering

Senior Director, Business Development Teledyne

1:30 PM - 3:15 PM
Room S402a

Introduction to Robot Risk Assessment

Jeff Fryman, Principal Consultant, Association for Advancing Automation

Topic(s): Automation Safety Getting Started with Automation Robotics: Applications, Systems & Innovations

There are more than 2.7 million industrial robots safely operating in factories worldwide, and the robotics industry can take pride in its impressive safety record. For nearly forty years, A3 Robotics – formerly the Robotic Industries Association – has taken a lead role in assuring that the robotics industry continues to proactively assess the safety environment and provide safety resources as robotic applications continue to expand. At the forefront of A3 Robotics’ leadership role in industrial robot safety is the development of the ANSI/RIA R15.06-2012 safety standard. 

Join A3's lead robot safety trainer to learn to help you keep your team safe and learn the basics of conducting a risk assessment for your facilities.

Jeff Fryman

Jeff Fryman

Principal Consultant Association for Advancing Automation

1:30 PM - 2:15 PM
Room S402b

The Importance of Signal to Noise in SWIR Imaging: Why Is My SWIR Image Black?

Martin H. Ettenberg, CEO/President, Princeton Infrared Technologies, Inc.

Topic(s): Machine Vision, Imaging & Inspection

In this talk, we will delve into the fundamental significance of Signal to Noise Ratios (SNR) in Short Wave Infrared (SWIR) imaging and detection applications. The choice of SWIR camera holds an important role in shaping the outcomes of detection and imaging, especially when dealing with high frame rates where SNR is critical. Our exploration will encompass an in-depth analysis of dark current, read noise, quantum efficiency, and frame rate, shedding light on their substantial influence on the detection of SWIR phenomena in both imaging and spectroscopic applications.

Throughout this talk, we will discuss how these various factors interact and affect one another. While the wavelength of light holds undeniable importance in discerning specific characteristics, it is imperative to recognize that SNR can be the decisive component enabling machine vision algorithms to execute detection tasks without errors. Real-world imagery will be employed to illustrate the impact of SNR on detection and how inadequate signal-to-noise ratios can render various machine vision algorithms and artificial intelligence ineffective in achieving their intended objectives.  Choosing the wrong camera with poor SNR is like trying to pull your camper with a moped.  You are just going to go nowhere, as it is underpowered for the job.

Martin H. Ettenberg

Martin H. Ettenberg

CEO/President Princeton Infrared Technologies, Inc.

1:30 PM - 2:15 PM
Room S401cd

The Next Frontier of Automation: Human-Centric Robots

Melonee Wise, CTO, Agility Robotics

Topic(s): Autonomous Mobile Robotics Robotics: Applications, Systems & Innovations

The maturity of the robotics industry has been profound over the past 10 years. Vision systems have improved drastically, computing power has moved to the edge, the cost of parts has become less expensive, and developments with AI and engineering have surpassed what was previously imaginable. As a result, innovative companies have built advanced robotic systems that have found success in the commercial world – robots are no longer confined to research and university labs. It is well-known that one industry has been leading the charge in adopting these advanced robotic solutions: warehousing and logistics. Warehousing has some of the most advanced automated solutions, but many have been deployed in silos and have created islands of automation.  Hear from Melonee Wise, CTO of Agility Robotics and veteran robotics pioneer, on the current and future state of robotics in the warehousing industry. Learn how to prepare your warehouse for the next phase of robotics – human-centric, humanoid robots – and how to connect existing islands of automation.

Melonee Wise

Melonee Wise

CTO Agility Robotics

1:30 PM - 2:15 PM
Room S403a

The growth potential of robotics is immense. Yet, many businesses – including SMEs – are still waiting for the right opportunity to invest.

How can robotics be turned into a compelling business opportunity for these new end-users?

By drawing upon insights from several hundred automation projects and 1000+ supplier proposals from HowToRobot’s global marketplace, Søren Peters will show how to fill the gaps between new buyers and sellers and accelerate adoption, including:

  • The common communication gaps between buyers and sellers during the procurement process – and how to address them.
  • How current business models are discouraging businesses from investing in robotics – and how to turn customer incentives around.
  • The key “market switch” that accelerated IT adoption among mainstream users – and what the robotics industry can learn from it.
Søren Peters

Søren Peters

CEO HowToRobot

1:30 PM - 2:15 PM
Room S403b

Using AI for Semantic Segmentation of Livestock in Time-of-Flight Depth Video

Daniel Lau, Professor, University of Kentucky

Topic(s): AI & Smart Automation Machine Vision, Imaging & Inspection

Livestock management is a growing market for 3D video, but using AI to detect and monitor animals from depth video is a particularly challenging problem given the lack of labeled data sets and pre-trained AI models.  So to do so, one needs to collect data, label the data, train the AI model, and then export the AI model to something one can integrate into OpenCV or OpenVino libraries.  Each of these steps is essential to achieving accurate segmentation, and if not given the appropriate time and energy, could spell doom for the entire project. So in this presentation, I share personal experiences with training an AI model from a livestock video and relate what worked and what didn't so you can avoid the mistakes while enjoying my successes in your projects.

Daniel Lau

Daniel Lau

Professor University of Kentucky

2:00 PM - 3:00 PM
Room S405a

Introduction to Magnetism and Motor Basics

Mark Holcomb, Director of Product Management and Application Engineering, Genesis Motion Solutions

Topic(s): Motion Control & Conveyance Motors & Drives

Basics of magnetics and the types of magnets found in motors. Overview of the basic functions and styles of electric motors commonly used in industrial automation, including the operating difference between brushed, brushless, step, AC induction, and direct drive motors.

Mark Holcomb

Mark Holcomb

Director of Product Management and Application Engineering Genesis Motion Solutions

2:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Room S404ab

The Fundamentals of Camera & Image Sensor Technology

Philip Freidin, Applications Engineer, IDS Imaging Development Systems

Topic(s): Machine Vision, Imaging & Inspection

Gain an understanding of digital camera principles. Find out about different camera types and their capabilities. Learn about what digital interfaces these cameras use, from Gigabit Ethernet to Camera Link HS. Other topics include how image sensors capture light, basic understanding of image quality terms, digital camera parameterization, and the capabilities of monochrome versus color sensors.

Philip Freidin

Philip Freidin

Applications Engineer IDS Imaging Development Systems

2:30 PM - 3:15 PM
Room S403a

Automation 301: Improving Key Steps in Your Automation Process

Scott Marsic, Group Product Manager, Epson Robots

Topic(s): Automation Systems, Design & Integration Getting Started with Automation The Business Of Automation

Everything built is created through a manufacturing process. It's never just one step, but rather a series of activities and actions that result in a finished product. These steps are often intertwined in varying degrees of order and linearity, even transcending multiple facilities and multiple suppliers.

This webinar will review the primary process steps seen in most automated manufacturing projects, the importance of these elements, how to approach and define each step, and then insight into maximizing process outcomes from both operational and business perspectives. Real-world examples will be utilized throughout to provide context, along with tips to take advantage of and pitfalls to avoid.

Scott Marsic

Scott Marsic

Group Product Manager Epson Robots

2:30 PM - 3:15 PM
Room S402b

Digital Thread and Digital Twins Used to Control and Monitor Real-Time Manufacturing Process at Boeing

Wen Jiang, Boeing Designated Expert(BDE) in Factory Automation, Boeing Commercial Airplanes

Topic(s): AI & Smart Automation Automation Systems, Design & Integration

This presentation will demonstrate how the Digital Thread and Digital Twins are used to control and monitor the real-time manufacturing of the Super Profiler Cell and Henry Coolant Filter process line at Boeing Portland. The demo project in this presentation used Siemens’ TIA Portal to create a 3D digital twin model and control program Via Profinet communication protocol. It will work in a real-time 3D digital twin model with a  machine controller. 

These Digital Twins utilize the ISO 23247 Digital Twin Manufacturing Framework as well as ANSI/ISA95/IEC 62264-1.
Hardware: Siemens 840D Sl CNC and S7-300 PLC, Rockwell ControlLogix PLC
Software: (real-time 3D digital twin model) – Rockwell Automation FactoryTalk® View SE, SIMATIC WinCC. 
Communication protocol: Rslink, Profinet.

Wen Jiang

Wen Jiang

Boeing Designated Expert(BDE) in Factory Automation Boeing Commercial Airplanes

2:30 PM - 3:15 PM
Room S401cd

How to Calculate ROI of Automation when the Investment is Zero with Robots-as-a-Service

Misa Ilkhechi, Co-Founder VP of Sales, Formic

Topic(s): Robotics: Applications, Systems & Innovations The Business Of Automation

As a zero CapEx and pay-as-you-go model, the automation approach known as "Robots-as-a-Service" (RaaS) disrupts the conventional way of justifying automation investment. With RaaS, how do Operations and Engineering Managers then calculate the business value of automation when it is rented instead of purchased? In this case, the best calculation approach uses a different comparison to the current operation financials, and it can be summarized into a single Net Present Value for comparison against capital purchases if desired. Attend this session to learn how!

Misa Ilkhechi

Misa Ilkhechi

Co-Founder VP of Sales Formic

3:00 PM - 4:30 PM
Room S405a

Positioner Selection and Motor Sizing

Jim Wiley, Product Manager, Parker Hannifin

Topic(s): Motion Control & Conveyance Motors & Drives

How to select an appropriate single-axis positioner for specific application requirements based on loading, environment, motion profile, and positioning performance. Overview on determining the required torque, speed, and inertia of the motor/drive system that is needed for your application.

Jim Wiley

Jim Wiley

Product Manager Parker Hannifin

3:30 PM - 5:30 PM
Room S404d

High-Speed, Real-Time Machine Vision

Perry C. West, President, Automated Vision Systems, Inc.

Topic(s): Machine Vision, Imaging & Inspection

This course gives you the insights to achieve the speed and performance you need in your vision systems including system architecture, programming tips, and common challenges.  You will understand the ways high-speed is determined and the different real-time performance requirements.  The course follows two vision system designs to see how high-speed and real-time techniques are put into practice.

Perry C. West

Perry C. West

President Automated Vision Systems, Inc.

3:30 PM - 4:15 PM
Room S401ab

I Need to Automate, So Now What

Jason Walker, VP, Market Development, Locus Robotics

Topic(s): Autonomous Mobile Robotics Logistics & Supply Chain Automation

Surprisingly, many warehouses around the world still function without any form of automation. However, this is changing dramatically as effective and affordable robotics makes adding automation easier. And the automation options can seem endless. 

How do you know what type is right for your operation and your workflows, and what should you know to pick the right one? 

Learn how to evaluate the wide range of available technologies and what each can do for your productivity, your workers' safety and ergonomics, and your bottom line. We’ll show you how these different technologies work, what they’re best at, how they can increase productivity and efficiency, what you need to look out for, and how each delivers ROI.

Jason Walker

Jason Walker

VP, Market Development Locus Robotics

3:30 PM - 4:15 PM
Room S401cd

Increased Efficiency with Common DC bus Drive Systems

Craig Nelson, Senior Product Manager, Siemens Digital Industries

Topic(s): Motors & Drives

AC drive systems for variable speed motors are experiencing accelerated growth thanks to several predominant trends in manufacturing including higher levels of automation and efficiency. Along with the expansion of system-type drive installations for industrial machinery is the increased adaption of what is termed the “Common DC Bus” design for AC drive systems. This approach offers users several advantages for applications with multiple AC drives especially when they are in a coordinated system typical for motion control and production lines.

Craig Nelson

Craig Nelson

Senior Product Manager Siemens Digital Industries

3:30 PM - 4:15 PM
Room S402b

Protect and Enhance Your Imaging System with Optical Filters

Georgy Das, Director of Systems & Training, Midwest Optical Systems

Topic(s): Machine Vision, Imaging & Inspection

Machine Vision Filters play a critical role in 3D systems like LED/Laser Metrology. MidOpt® Optical Filters are designed to enhance contrast and improve resolution in these types of applications by selectively passing light from a specific range of wavelengths while blocking unwanted light. This helps to reduce interference and increase signal-to-noise ratio, leading to more accurate measurements and improved system performance. 

MidOpt® will also discuss how Protective Windows play an important role in shielding lenses and enclosures from harsh environments without affecting image quality and the many available options to customize Protective Windows for specific application needs, including:

  • Coatings: oleophobic and anti-reflection coatings to enhance durability and image quality
  • Silk Screening: available in a variety of colors and opacities for printing borders, masks, or logos
  • Chemical Strengthening: for applications where the glass is placed in front of a camera lens and optical distortion and surface quality are important
  • Assembly Mounting Tape: for easy assembly when screws are not an option
Georgy Das

Georgy Das

Director of Systems & Training Midwest Optical Systems

3:30 PM - 4:15 PM
Room S402a

TBA

3:30 PM - 4:15 PM
Room S403a

Updates on Machine Vision Standards

Bob McCurrach, Director of Standards Development, Association For Advancing Automation

Topic(s): Getting Started with Automation Machine Vision, Imaging & Inspection

Get the latest information on global vision standards from the experts. Join Bob McCurrach from A3 Vision & Imaging and other vision experts for this important update.

Bob McCurrach

Bob McCurrach

Director of Standards Development Association For Advancing Automation

Wednesday, May 8, 2024
8:00 AM - 10:00 AM
Room S404d

Advanced Vision Guided Robotics

David Bruce, Engineering Manager, FANUC America

Topic(s): Machine Vision, Imaging & Inspection

This course covers 2D & 3D machine vision camera calibration for machine guidance including for industrial robots together with basic information on the types of industrial robots in use today.  Along with the methods for representing 3D positional data for both machine vision and industrial robotics and how to ensure a machine vision system provides useful positional data to an industrial robot for a Vision Guided Robot (VGR) application.  The course also presents how to implement a fixed-mounted and robot-mounted 2D/3D VGR application as well as examples of each.

David Bruce

David Bruce

Engineering Manager FANUC America

8:00 AM - 8:45 AM
Room S401cd

AGV Validation

Rushiraj Patwardhan, Safety Engineer, Pilz Automation Safety L.P

Topic(s): Automation Safety Autonomous Mobile Robotics

The presentation aims to provide attendees with an overview of the safety requirements for AGV and its validation. The course will focus on the verification and validation of AGV based on applicable standards. The attendees will have an understanding of the steps involved in validation to ensure compliance with current standards and requirements. 
Validation that the main safety principle is effectively implemented, and their effect is sufficient for the desired risk reduction. Typically, this kind of validation will consist of a Visual inspection of the AGV, a Functional test to check if reactions of safety measures are adequate for the intended purpose, a Review of risk assessment by revaluation of the risks after the measures have been implemented, and a Review of the documentation. ISO 3691-4 & ANSI B56.5

Rushiraj Patwardhan

Rushiraj Patwardhan

Safety Engineer Pilz Automation Safety L.P

8:00 AM - 8:45 AM
Room S403a

COBOTs Make Fiber Laser Welding Easy

Michael Sharpe, Executive Director - Materials Joining Sales, FANUC America Corporation

Topic(s): Collaborative Robotics

Collaborative Robots (Cobot) are all the rage in many application areas because of their ease of use and simple operation.  Teaching a Cobot through lead through method and programming from a tablet icon-based programming makes this the easiest robot to use.  Recently, handheld lasers entered the market providing high power and excellent beam quality for welding and cleaning applications.  These lasers have an ease-of-use factor enabling almost anyone to make a quality laser weld.   NEW software and hardware developments combine the high value and low operating cost of Cobots and Handheld Lasers improving the productivity and application use for these high tech easy-to-use machines.  This talk will cover Cobot operation, handheld laser ease of use, and the synergy of both products showcasing the latest in robotic laser automation.

Michael Sharpe

Michael Sharpe

Executive Director - Materials Joining Sales FANUC America Corporation

8:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Room S401ab

Designing Autonomous AI Agents

Kence Anderson, CEO & Co-Founder, Composabl, Inc.

Topic(s): AI & Smart Automation

TBA

Kence Anderson

Kence Anderson

CEO & Co-Founder Composabl, Inc.

8:00 AM - 10:00 AM
Room S404ab

Image Processing Fundamentals

Heiko Eisele, President, MVTec USA

Topic(s): Machine Vision, Imaging & Inspection

This course will cover 2D & 3D machine vision camera calibration for machine guidance including for industrial robots and basic information on the types of industrial robots in use today.  Along with the various methods for representing 3D positional data for both machine vision and industrial robotics and how to ensure a machine vision system will provide useful positional data to an industrial robot for a Vision Guided Robot (VGR) application.  Details of how to implement a fixed mounted and robot mounted 2D/3D VGR application as well as examples of each will also be presented.

Heiko Eisele

Heiko Eisele

President MVTec USA

8:00 AM - 8:45 AM
Room S402b

OPC UA - Secure Interoperability from Sensor to Cloud

Michael Clark, Director OPC Foundation North America, OPC Foundation

Topic(s): AI & Smart Automation Automation Systems, Design & Integration

Presented by OPC Foundation, learn how leading industrial facilities – from renewable energy to cosmetics, to automakers – are employing secure, digital interoperability from the shop floor to the top floor. See how wind, solar, robotics, and cybersecurity all are masterfully served under the International IEC62541 Standard of OPC Unified Architecture. Deployments include Client/Server and Pub/Sub frameworks utilizing all transports, including TCP, UDP, MQTT, and more. With the world’s largest ecosystem of end-users, manufacturers, and partner associations, The OPC Foundation is the gravity center for secure industrial interoperability.

Michael Clark

Michael Clark

Director OPC Foundation North America OPC Foundation

8:00 AM - 8:45 AM
Room S402a

Revolutionizing Industrial Metrology: How Advanced 3D Laser Sensors Are Changing the Game

Gretchen Alper, Business Director, AT - Automation Technology, Inc.

Topic(s): Machine Vision, Imaging & Inspection

In this presentation, we will explore the latest trends and developments in sensor technology, specifically focusing on laser triangulation sensors and their impact on metrology applications. We will discuss how advancements in resolution, speed, and on-sensor processing are pushing the limits of sensor-to-FPGA interfaces, leading to more efficient and cost-effective solutions. The presentation will also examine the benefits of customized sensor configurations based on standard sensor modules and the emergence of multi-feature sensors that enable advanced multi-channel evaluations while reducing system costs.?

Moreover, we will highlight the growing importance of standardization in sensor features and data levels, which facilitate ease of use and faster time-to-market for application solutions. Finally, we will delve into the trends in 3D processing technology, particularly the increasing adoption of multi-sensor setups for fast and precise metrology applications. These setups are replacing traditional tactile coordinate measuring machines (CMMs), enabling new inline applications. To fully harness the potential of these technologies, we will emphasize the need for standardized algorithms and characterized scanners following existing metrology norms.

Gretchen Alper

Gretchen Alper

Business Director AT - Automation Technology, Inc.

9:00 AM - 10:00 AM
Room S405a

Digital Servo Amplifier Basics

Ronnie Belcher, Product Training Engineer, Yaskawa America

Topic(s): Motion Control & Conveyance Motors & Drives

The basic operation of a digital servo amplifier, including servo control loops, tuning a servo system, defining system bandwidth, and how to select the proper amplifier for applications. Basics of the major networks/field busses and advantages/disadvantages of each.

Ronnie Belcher

Ronnie Belcher

Product Training Engineer Yaskawa America

9:00 AM - 9:45 AM
Grand Ballroom S100

One Robot for Any Task

Daniela Rus, Professor (Electrical Engineering and Computer Science), Director of CSAIL, MIT

The digitization of practically everything coupled with advances in machine learning, the automation of knowledge work, and advanced robotics promises a future with democratized use of machines and wide-spread use of AI, robots and customization. While the last 60 years have defined the field of industrial robots and empowered hard-bodied robots to execute complex assembly tasks in constrained industrial settings, the next 60 years could be ushering in our time with Pervasive robots that come in a diversity of forms and materials, helping people with physical and cognitive tasks.

Daniela Rus

Daniela Rus

Professor (Electrical Engineering and Computer Science), Director of CSAIL MIT

10:00 AM - 11:30 AM
Room S405a

Motion Controllers, Programming, and System Design Basics

Jim Wiley, Product Manager, Parker Hannifin

Topic(s): Motion Control & Conveyance Motors & Drives

Overview of the software and hardware elements necessary to build a motion system, and how to integrate motion with other systems when designing a machine. Basic motion control software and programming languages.

Jim Wiley

Jim Wiley

Product Manager Parker Hannifin

10:00 AM - 11:15 AM
Room S403a

Why Ease-of-Use is Key for Flexible Robot Solutions…and How to Achieve It

Martin Naumann, CEO, drag and bot GmbH (part of KEBA group)

Topic(s): AI & Smart Automation Robotics: Applications, Systems & Innovations

The session will give an overview of why ease-of-use is important for flexible robot solutions and how it can be achieved followed by the example of an easy-to-use flexible robot solution by Zimmer Group, the ZiMo (www.zimmer-group.com/en/technologies-components/system-technology/zimo-the-freely-configurable-handling-system).

Why ease-of-use is important?
Because of skilled labor shortage, mass customization resulting in High-Mix-Low-Volume production, global competition, and reshoring, automation solutions that can be deployed and adapted flexibly are becoming ever more important. Easy-to-use interfaces are a key element of these solutions.

Traditional High-Volume-Low-Mix robot systems are set up by a solution provider and give the customer limited flexibility to adapt. This limited flexibility has been already thought of during requirements specification and is often realized using a dedicated PLC visualization to modify or add recipes containing process parameters that can be adapted by the customer. Adaptations beyond this “recipe management” can only be done by the solution provider. This has a high lead-time, is expensive, and therefore not done regularly… and also not required for Low-Mix-High-Volume production.

But this way of realizing automation solutions is not applicable for High-Mix-Low-Volume production where adaptations need to be done regularly with short lead time and little extra costs. In the end, this means that shopfloor workers need to be able to adapt automation solutions themselves without support from external experts.

What does ease-of-use mean exactly?
In this chapter different levels of adaptions/ease-of-use and the requirements of different target groups will be presented and discussed:

Levels of adaptions/ease-of-use

  • Change parameters
  • Change trajectories
  • Adapt logic, sequence, and add processes

Target groups

  • Shopfloor technicians: technical background, but no robot expert, no programming skills
  • Shopfloor operators: no technical background

Solutions for easy-to-use interfaces.
In this chapter, different available solutions, their possibilities, and their benefits to achieve ease of use are presented and discussed:

  • PLC visualizations
  • Graphical cobot/robot interfaces with no-code programming
  • Software solutions like drag&bot OS
  • Others: speech, pens, …

Example: ZiMo flexible robot cell

In conclusion, an example of a flexible robot cell is presented, the ZiMo (www.zimmer-group.com/en/technologies-components/system-technology/zimo-the-freely-configurable-handling-system). The focus will be on the easy-to-use interface, its possibilities, the underlying system architecture and why ease of use is key for ZiMo.

Martin Naumann

Martin Naumann

CEO drag and bot GmbH (part of KEBA group)

10:15 AM - 11:00 AM
Room S402b

AMR Interoperability (Mass Robotics)

Topic(s): Autonomous Mobile Robotics Robotics: Applications, Systems & Innovations

TBA

10:15 AM - 11:00 AM
Room S401cd

How Electric Motor Design Innovation Will Advance Automation

Brian Casey, CEO and President, ECM PCB Stator Tech

Topic(s): Motors & Drives

Mr. Casey is an expert in the energy and technology industry with over 30 years of experience. This includes leading two companies from growth-stage, to scale, to acquisition.

As the founder and CEO of sustainable energy firm, SourceOne,  Brian was responsible for the overall management and technical efforts of the company. He successfully raised equity investments, targeted and acquired a complementing business from a Fortune 500 company, and developed a uniquely qualified commercial, private utility offering. Under Mr. Casey’s direction, SourceOne created and implemented award-winning, sustainable energy projects for its customers and secured multi-million-dollar energy efficiency and infrastructure contracts within the private and public sectors.

Veolia Environnement S.A. acquired SourceOne in April of 2007. Mr. Casey continued to grow SourceOne over the next several years, realizing double-digit growth in revenue and earnings and delivering significant shareholder value.

From there, Mr. Casey co-founded SourceGreen, an industrial-scale solar energy development company that successfully created 8 MWs of renewable solar energy within the state of Massachusetts. NextSun Energy acquired SourceGreen in 2013.

In his role as President and CEO of ECM PCB Stator Technology, Brian has driven ECM’s development as a global electric motor design and SaaS company. ECM pairs advanced Motor CAD and patented PCB Stator—printed circuit board—technology to create next-generation electric motors that are lighter, quieter, and more energy and space-efficient across a broad range of use cases.

Mr. Casey has led the adoption of ECM’s technology by multiple partners across a broad range of verticals: HVAC, Consumer Electronics, E-Mobility, Fitness, Medical, Robotics, Renewable Energy, Aerospace, Defense, and more.

Brian served on the board of Hubbell Power Systems and acquired Cantega Technologies—an industry-leading software platform for the manufacture of dielectric polymer products that serve the electric utility industry.

Mr. Casey holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Electrical Engineering with a concentration in Power Systems & Delivery from Northeastern University.

Brian Casey

Brian Casey

CEO and President ECM PCB Stator Tech

10:15 AM - 11:00 AM
Room S402a

Leveraging AI to Deliver Human-Centered Automation

Satyandra K. Gupta, Co-Founder & Chief Scientist, GrayMatter Robotics

Topic(s): AI & Smart Automation Robotics: Applications, Systems & Innovations

Humans have always played an important role in manufacturing enterprises. Humans offer unparalleled flexibility to quickly adapt and have creative abilities to handle new challenges. Humans are also the best at deciding what features offer the highest value to potential customers. Humans will continue to play an important role in the next generation of manufacturing as we move from mass-produced products to cost-effective customization and personalization. Deploying automation without considering its interaction and impact on humans will simply not work. We need human-centered automation technologies that increase human productivity, reduce health risks for humans, and improve quality of life through innovation.

In the past, robots were used as programmable machines to automate dull, dirty, and dangerous tasks. These types of robot implementation did not facilitate collaboration between humans and robots. Recent advances in the field of Artificial Intelligence (AI) are enabling the realization of smart robotic assistants that can increase human productivity, enable innovation, and make workplaces more accessible to people with disabilities. 

Many applications require the use of multiple collaborating robots to operate under human supervision to deliver human-centered automation solutions. To be useful in such applications, robots need to (1) program themselves, (2) efficiently learn from the observed performance, (3) safely operate in the presence of uncertainty, (4) appropriately call for help during the execution of challenging tasks, and (5) effectively interact with humans. We will use manufacturing applications as illustrative examples to discuss how robots can learn to autonomously manipulate tools and deliver human competitive task performance. 

This presentation will provide an overview of physics-informed AI technologies that enable robots to learn safe and efficient autonomous tool manipulation. These new technologies serve as the foundation for realizing smart automation for sanding, polishing, buffing, spraying, and coating applications. AI-based planning enables the automated generation of efficient robot trajectories for performing complex tool motions to meet process-specific requirements. The use of synthetic images generated from physics-informed simulations enables the use of deep learning in defect detection. Self-supervised active learning enables the robotic cell to autonomously and safely conduct experiments to learn the process parameters most efficiently. Generative AI techniques enable humans to interact with robots in a much more natural way. 

This presentation will conclude by presenting case studies that illustrate the benefits of human-centered automation. The deployment of human-centered automation is increasing human productivity and reducing the need for humans to perform ergonomically challenging tasks. It is also contributing to more sustainable manufacturing by reducing the resources needed in manufacturing and minimizing scrap and rework.

Satyandra K. Gupta

Satyandra K. Gupta

Co-Founder & Chief Scientist GrayMatter Robotics

10:30 AM - 12:00 PM
Room S404d

Non-Visible Imaging: Infrared Technology and Applications

Martin H. Ettenberg, CEO/President, Princeton Infrared Technologies, Inc.

Topic(s): Machine Vision, Imaging & Inspection

Non-visible imaging methods offer unique benefits for a variety of vision tasks. In this session, you’ll learn more about infrared and thermal techniques and better understand if non-visible imaging solutions are right for your specific needs.

Martin H. Ettenberg

Martin H. Ettenberg

CEO/President Princeton Infrared Technologies, Inc.

10:30 AM - 1:00 PM
Room S404ab

Vision System Design

David Dechow, Owner, Machine Vision Source

Topic(s): Machine Vision, Imaging & Inspection

Ultimately the value of any machine vision technology lies in the successful implementation of a systems solution for a task in an automated process. The knowledge gained in cameras, lighting, optics, and image processing is the foundation required to move on to the successful design of a working machine vision system. In this course, you will learn the role of machine vision systems design in the broader task of systems integration and the general steps and strategies involved in the design of a vision system, including selection of components in typical use cases, and specification of the implementation of those components. The information provided will enable you to participate in and support a team delivering practical machine vision to plant floor automation.

David Dechow

David Dechow

Owner Machine Vision Source

11:15 AM - 12:00 PM
Room S401cd

8 Key Considerations When Assessing Autonomous Mobile Robot (AMR) Vendors

Jason Okerman, Staff Product Manager, OTTO Motors

Topic(s): Advances in Material Handling Automation Systems, Design & Integration Autonomous Mobile Robotics

The global marketplace is highly competitive, with constant pressure to innovate in order to avoid falling behind. Manufacturers are asking themselves what changes are needed to stay competitive, what expectations their customers have, and what their industry will look like in five years. The answer is automation. Since material handling is one of the biggest consumers of labor in a manufacturing operation, leading manufacturers have implemented autonomous mobile robots (AMRs) to save money, improve efficiency, keep people safe, and ensure business continuity.

Once a manufacturer has determined that AMRs are the right solution for their facility, their next step is to identify the AMR provider that is best suited to automate their material handling workflows based on their specific requirements.

In this session, attendees will learn the eight key considerations in their search to select the right AMRs for their facility. Each consideration will also include a list of specific questions that manufacturers can ask shortlisted vendors to help them understand which vendor is the right match for their needs. Attendees will also be provided with an evaluation worksheet to assist them as they visit each AMR booth at the expo.

Jason Okerman

Jason Okerman

Staff Product Manager OTTO Motors

11:15 AM - 12:00 PM
Room S402a

Emerging Tactile Sensing Technology Solving the Challenges in Robot & Cobot Safety

Utku Buyuksahin, President & CTO, Sensobright Industries LLC

Topic(s): Automation Safety Collaborative Robotics Robotics: Applications, Systems & Innovations

In the United States alone there were nearly 50 fatalities and tens of thousands of injuries attributed to robots and cobots in the workplace over the last 25 years. Despite great leaps in safety solutions, accidents are still happening because of the lack of more effective surrounding sensing. Safety concerns force manufacturers to slow down the robots and cobots to keep humans safe which leads to loss of efficiency and still doesn’t prevent all accidents. Some manufacturers are using stationary area scanners or cameras, which leave areas around the robot unprotected with limited coverage, others are using solutions like air pressure sensors that require a collision with a human or object to occur before the system will shut down.

With the advent of new tactile sensing technology, robots can now sense their surroundings and identify approaching humans and objects via proximity sensing without the need for physical contact and without blind spots. This technology not only improves safety but also increases manufacturing productivity by enabling robots to work faster and safer. In this presentation, we will explore the mechanics of this technology and examine how it is being used to upgrade safety and efficiency with real-world examples.

Utku Buyuksahin

Utku Buyuksahin

President & CTO Sensobright Industries LLC

11:15 AM - 12:00 PM
Room S403a

Selecting the Right Conveyance for Your Application – A Smart Conveyance Case Study

Ben Hope, Director of Product Commercialization, SuperTrak CONVEYANCE

Topic(s): Motion Control & Conveyance The Business Of Automation

Selecting the right conveyance technology early in your design phase is critical to ensuring future success with your factory automation system. Since your conveyance platform touches virtually every element of your system, it impacts your system’s overall performance and can dictate things such as tooling required, throughput, and effort required for programming and operation.

Far too often we see machine builders sticking with the same technology they always have used; this is for several reasons, they don’t have the time to learn a new technology, they think a new technology will introduce too much risk, or they don’t fully understand how to calculate the ROI of a new technology. 

During this session, Ben Hope, SuperTrak CONVEYANCE™’s Director of Product Commercialization, will walk through a real-life case study of a top machine builder who made the switch to Smart Conveyance and ultimately saw their end-user improve their efficiency, floorspace, and ROI for the end user.

Ben Hope

Ben Hope

Director of Product Commercialization SuperTrak CONVEYANCE

11:15 AM - 12:00 PM
Room S402b

Transform Your Workforce into a Competitive Advantage with Augmented Reality (AR)

Paul Ryznar, Founder & CEO, LightGuide

Topic(s): AI & Smart Automation

The manufacturing industry is facing several challenges, including labor shortages, increasing competition, and changing customer demands. Augmented reality (AR) is helping manufacturers overcome these challenges by bridging the skills gap, equipping workers with the tools they need to excel in complex tasks, and making manufacturing jobs safer and more efficient. By strategically leveraging AR, manufacturers can optimize production processes and gain a competitive edge in the market.

In this session, LightGuide CEO Paul Ryznar will discuss how augmented reality (AR) is transforming the manufacturing industry. These technologies can be used to improve training, safety, ergonomics, productivity, and quality control. AR gives manufacturers a way to empower their workforce and transform them into a competitive advantage.

Case studies from the Automotive, Aerospace, and Defense industries will demonstrate the benefits of AR for manufacturing and workforce transformation.

Paul Ryznar

Paul Ryznar

Founder & CEO LightGuide

1:45 PM - 3:45 PM
Room S405a

Review the CMCP courses and prepare for the certification exam.

2:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Room S404d

Advanced Color Machine Vision & Applications

Romik Chatterjee, VP Business Development, Graftek Imaging

Topic(s): Machine Vision, Imaging & Inspection

Explore the different levels of image quality at the sensor level.  Details relating to quantum efficiency, dark noise, signal to noise ratio will be discussed in detail.  In addition to topics related to area scan cameras, the proper usage of line scan and TDI cameras will be reviewed. Sensor size classification and relationship to the camera’s lens mount will be covered.

Romik Chatterjee

Romik Chatterjee

VP Business Development Graftek Imaging

2:15 PM - 3:00 PM
Room S401cd

How Generative AI will transform manufacturing

Topic(s): AI & Smart Automation

Generative AI is a type of AI that can create new content and ideas, including conversations, stories, images, videos, and music. It is powered by large models that are pre-trained on vast amounts of data, commonly referred to as foundation models (FMs). With generative AI, manufacturers have the potential to reinvent their businesses and disrupt their industry.

The potential of generative AI is incredibly exciting. But, we are still in the very early days. Companies have been working on FMs for years, but how can manufacturers take advantage of what is out there today to transform their business, and where should they start?

2:15 PM - 4:00 PM
Room S402b

Introduction to Mobile Robot Risk Assessment

Robert Bollinger, Owner, Dynamic Horizons Automation Solutions LLC

Topic(s): Automation Safety Autonomous Mobile Robotics

Risk assessment is a key step in the development of safety solutions for all robot systems. When IMRs are part of the system, the risk assessment approach needs to be expanded beyond the typical task/hazard pairs of traditional systems. This session explores the additional scope to be considered when autonomous mobility is introduced.

Robert Bollinger

Robert Bollinger

Owner Dynamic Horizons Automation Solutions LLC

2:15 PM - 3:00 PM
Room S403a

Simple Smart Cameras for AI and Industry 4.0

Michael Nagle, Machine Vision Specialist, Baumer

Topic(s): AI & Smart Automation Machine Vision, Imaging & Inspection

The widespread use of imaging technology requires easy-to-use, powerful, and flexible smart cameras to simplify system design and provide a low total cost of ownership (TCO). Smart cameras with integrated AI can optimize automation processes to save companies money and time, but they are currently being underutilized in many industries.

In this webinar, Nagle highlights how AI technology helps companies optimize their processes and solve tricky automation applications. Throughout the presentation, Nagle discusses the potential for smart cameras in AI applications and the benefits and challenges of freely programmable smart cameras. He provides examples of applications where smart cameras have been successful along with a look at how the program works with AI.

Michael Nagle

Michael Nagle

Machine Vision Specialist Baumer

2:15 PM - 3:00 PM
Room S402a

Worker-Centric Mobile Robot Integration: Unlocking Manufacturing Excellence

Denise Stafford, Business Development Manager, KUKA Robotics

Topic(s): Autonomous Mobile Robotics Building Tomorrow’s Workforce

Recent advancements in mobile robot technology have made it increasingly accessible for integration into manufacturing and production environments. Reduced investment costs and the persistent challenge of attracting and retaining manufacturing workers have fueled a surge in mobile robot projects. Despite the available technology and funding, a substantial number of robotic process automation projects worldwide encounter difficulties, with Ernst and Young's study reporting challenges and setbacks ranging from 30% to 50%.

This raises the question: What hampers automation progress in manufacturing, and why do so many projects face obstacles? The answer partially lies in a disconnect between emerging technologies and the workers who have traditionally performed tasks being considered for automation. They often lack a substantial voice in the automation transition, despite their invaluable expertise honed through years of experience. As mobile robots increasingly become part of their workspace open, honest consultation can help minimize the challenges, but maximize opportunities for owners and workers.

While worker safety remains paramount in integrating mobile robots into manufacturing, it is equally critical to consider their expertise, experience, knowledge, and overall well-being. Automation should not replace human workers but enhance their capabilities. It should leverage human strengths for higher-skilled and more complex tasks. To achieve smart and effective automation, a comprehensive understanding of existing processes, strengths, and vulnerabilities is essential. Who better than those who engage with these processes daily to provide this insight? Mobile robots excel at routine tasks, allowing humans to focus on creativity and critical thinking.

This presentation offers a comprehensive overview of the challenges and opportunities associated with mobile robot integration in manufacturing. It delves into the distinctions between stationary and mobile robot integration, with a particular emphasis on their impact on workers. Unlike stationary collaborative robots, mobile robots engage more intimately with workers, necessitating deeper consideration of their well-being and expertise. In a world where respect, responsibility, and equitable treatment in the workplace are increasingly advocated, recognizing workers' input is pivotal.

Manufacturing workers are the undisputed process champions and experts. Their insights are invaluable for successful automation. This talk underscores the importance of not only protecting workers but also empowering them as key stakeholders in the ongoing automation journey. By merging technology with workforce expertise, we can unlock the full potential of mobile robots in manufacturing while upholding principles of respect and shared responsibility.

In conclusion, integrating mobile robots into manufacturing offers substantial potential for productivity and efficiency enhancements. However, this transformation should not compromise workers' well-being or their vital expertise. Recognizing the value of workers' contributions and involving them in the automation process is essential for genuine success on the factory floor. This presentation will shed light on these critical considerations and offer insights into a more inclusive and effective approach to automation.

Denise Stafford

Denise Stafford

Business Development Manager KUKA Robotics

3:15 PM - 4:00 PM
Room S403a

Enabling A New Era of Motor Design

Bernhard Lichtenauer, Head of Marketing and Product Management Automation Technology II, Dr. Johannes Heidenhain GmbH

Topic(s): Motors & Drives

Encoders or resolvers have looked more or less the same all over the world for decades. Additionally, they need encapsulation to protect against environmental influences. How could a new way of encoder/motor integration provide the next level in motor design and eliminate the current restrictions? Machine-down situations are major horror scenarios for every operation. Money is lost because of strict maintenance scheduling or at worst because no maintenance schedule exists at all. Errors often expressed through vibrations of the drive train. External sensors are often a non-starter because there is too much effort to integrate, hardware or software-wise. What if a bearingless encoder can provide additional information about the system itself and through novel design concepts, improve motor performance by removing the need for motor de-rating?

Bernhard Lichtenauer

Bernhard Lichtenauer

Head of Marketing and Product Management Automation Technology II Dr. Johannes Heidenhain GmbH

3:15 PM - 4:00 PM
Room S401cd

Enabling Smart Factories with 5G-Driven Computer Vision – A Case Study

Alan Minney, Global Lead Strategic Partnerships, Enterprise & Emerging Business, Ericsson

Topic(s): AI & Smart Automation

Automotive component manufacturer, Hitachi Astemo, is continually exploring innovative solutions to help its customers improve quality, efficiency, and productivity. The company’s research and engineering teams wanted to explore potential use cases for 5G technology in the manufacturing industry and engaged Ericsson and AWS to collaborate in that effort. After identifying several potential use cases for 5G-enabled machine vision, Hitachi, Ericsson, and AWS set up a trial of a model private 5G wireless infrastructure at Hitachi Astemo’s manufacturing plant in Kentucky. 

Leveraging Ericsson 5G radios, AWS edge-to-cloud technologies, and Hitachi video analytics, the trial determined that 5G provides stable, reliable connectivity for manufacturing use cases leveraging AI and ML models. The trial also showed that a 5G infrastructure with edge and cloud technologies could scale effectively across multiple global manufacturing sites quickly and cost-effectively. 

In this session, we’ll explore the journey Hitachi, Ericsson, and AWS went through to demonstrate how defects can be detected earlier in the assembly process for greater quality assurance and the potential for significant cost savings by reducing waste.

Alan Minney

Alan Minney

Global Lead Strategic Partnerships, Enterprise & Emerging Business Ericsson

3:15 PM - 4:00 PM
Room S403b

Human Machine Interfaces - The Gateway to Your Data

Ramey Miller, HMI Product Marketing Manager, Siemens

Topic(s): AI & Smart Automation Robotics: Applications, Systems & Innovations

Are you thinking about future-proof operating and monitoring and do you want to master the challenges of digitalization?  Then you are looking for an open and flexible visualization system that combines modern and secure web and edge technologies and is developed far beyond the known platforms.  Join me as I discuss how to optimize your operator interface.  We’ll explore supported planning and traceability of production processes, along with having flexible access to all data in the project, and to provide you with efficient tools for analysis and minimizing downtime.

Ramey Miller

Ramey Miller

HMI Product Marketing Manager Siemens

3:15 PM - 4:00 PM
Room S402a

Robotic End Effector Technologies Adapted for Special Applications

Blake Hall, Systems Engineering Project Manager, SCHUNK

Topic(s): Advances in Material Handling Automation Systems, Design & Integration Robotics: Applications, Systems & Innovations

Automation technology is advancing at a fast pace. New technologies together with existing tried and true technologies build a strong offering of robotic end effectors to choose. Many gripping technologies are developed with flexibility in mind because most automation users can benefit from re-deploying an automated cell if their requirements change. As technologies advance and more challenging tasks are automated, customization is needed to fit specific needs. Many automation challenges can be solved with individual technologies. Oftentimes, unique automation projects require pairing gripping technologies together to accomplish an automation task.

In this session, we will review different gripping technologies and learn how they can be applied in both off-the-shelf situations and custom end-effector designs. Pneumatic, electric, vacuum, magnetic, and others each offer advantages and sometimes they need to be paired together to achieve the automation project goals. We will review the process of building a custom end effector including scope and discovery, concepting, and solution design. In many automation projects, the end effector can be the last piece considered because it is furthest away from the robot. In reality, the end effector is what interfaces with the workpiece and can be one of the most complex and important components of an automation system. Understanding questions to ask and information to obtain for end effector specification can be very important to successfully deploy automation.

Blake Hall

Blake Hall

Systems Engineering Project Manager SCHUNK

3:30 PM - 4:30 PM
Room S404ab

Additional fee required for certification exam.

4:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Room S405a

CMCP Exam (Optional. Additional Fee Required)

Topic(s): Motion Control & Conveyance Motors & Drives

CMCP Certification Exam (Optional. Additional Fee Required)

4:15 PM - 5:00 PM
Room S403a

Advances in Cobot Welding: Your New Welding Journey

Will Healy III, Global Industry Segment Leader, Welding, Universal Robots

Topic(s): Collaborative Robotics

Collaborative automation has revolutionized the metal fabrication industry and is quickly becoming the go-to productivity tool for skilled welders looking to multiply their productivity, ensure consistent quality, and extend their physically demanding careers.

This session will highlight advances in cobot welding through Coordinated Motion technology developed by Universal Robots. Join Will Healy, Global Industry Segment Leader for Welding at Universal Robots, as he unveils the transformative capabilities of our new technology, enabling metal fab businesses to optimize cycle time within automated systems, maintain a consistent Tool Center Point (TCP), and track TCP for enhanced efficiency and increased throughput. Discover how this innovation can propel your welders and metal fab processes to new heights.

Will Healy III

Will Healy III

Global Industry Segment Leader, Welding Universal Robots

4:15 PM - 5:00 PM
Room S401ab

Functional Safety

Simone Gianotti, Application Engineer Manager, Elmo Motion Control Inc.

Topic(s): Automation Safety Motion Control & Conveyance

The machine safety standards that evolved over the past few decades simplified and accelerated the machine design process. This lecture will present an overview of the relevant safety standards and discuss how the new servo drives with built-in certified functional safety can further facilitate machine design, increase safety, and reduce costs.

Simone Gianotti

Simone Gianotti

Application Engineer Manager Elmo Motion Control Inc.

4:15 PM - 5:00 PM
Room S401cd

Real-World Use Cases: Step into the South Korean E-Commerce Warehouse Industry and Discover How to Deliver A Successful Automation Experience to the Users

Chan Lee, CEO, Floatic

Topic(s): Autonomous Mobile Robotics Logistics & Supply Chain Automation

South Korea has a thriving e-commerce market that has been rapidly growing and evolving. The country’s e-commerce market share volume takes over 30% of its retail sector, marking it as one of the largest e-commerce markets in the world. South Korea has a strong digital infrastructure, high internet penetration, and a tech-savvy population, all of which have contributed to the expansion of the e-commerce sector.

Such rapid growth has necessitated advancements in warehouse automation to meet the increasing demand for efficient order processing, reduced delivery times, and improved customer satisfaction. However, compared to the growing need for automation and even in other countries including North America and European countries, South Korean warehouses are at the very early stage of acknowledging, understanding, and deploying such automation, especially in Autonomous Mobile Robots.

In this session, as a pioneer in AMR solutions provider in South Korea, we want to talk about the dilemmas we faced due to the gap arising from the high demands/poor on-site reality of e-commerce warehouse automation. We also want to share how we overcame them to deliver a successful AMR experience, using our two real-world cases of logistics giants in South Korea: 1) Lotte Global Logistics, and 2) LX Pantos.

This session can help listeners not only understand the market status of South Korea’s (+APAC) warehouse automation but also bring a thoughtful insight into the market potential from a long-term perspective.

Chan Lee

Chan Lee

CEO Floatic

4:15 PM - 5:00 PM
Room S402a

Special Lenses for Top and Side Inspection with Just One Camera: Advantages vs. Multi-camera Systems and Latest Innovations

Beatrice Danese, Product Manager, Opto Engineering

Topic(s): Machine Vision, Imaging & Inspection

Many machine vision applications, such as OCR/barcode reading on bottles and containers or defect detection inside threaded bores, require inspecting features randomly located both on the outer or inner sides of the part and the top and bottom surfaces.

The most common approach is to use multiple cameras to account for all views.  However, in this presentation, we will see how this can be more easily accomplished with a single camera thanks to special optics designed for 360° inspection that do not require any part rotation and allow you to avoid bulky and complex multi-camera systems.

The session will cover also the latest innovations in the design of all-round inspection lenses. These are key to solving the most complex applications in a variety of fields, such as the beverage and pharmaceutical industries, and will help you maximize the versatility of your vision system.

Beatrice Danese

Beatrice Danese

Product Manager Opto Engineering

4:15 PM - 5:00 PM
Room S402b

Spotlight on Smart Robotic Sanding: Solving Age Old Customer Problems in New Ways

Topic(s): Material Removal, Grinding & Abrasives Robotics: Applications, Systems & Innovations

TBA

Thursday, May 9, 2024
8:00 AM - 8:45 AM
Room S401ab

All-In-One: Accelerating Robotic Success Through Holistic Factory Control

Thomas Kuckhoff, Product Manager – Controllers and Industrial PC’s, Omron Automation America

Topic(s): AI & Smart Automation Automation Systems, Design & Integration

Increasing the success of the deployment of a specific robot can be found in methods to increase the utility of the robot and to increase the adoption rate of the robot across processes within the same facility. Thus, maximizing returns on capital by maximizing the network effect of the asset. In this Automate Session, Omron Automation will introduce how to increase the utility and adoption of OEM’s or SI’s robotics by integrating robotics into an all-in-one automation control platform. By focusing on integration into native ecosystems, teams can accelerate the success of newer robotics technology. Specifically, the session will introduce how this mindset decreases commissioning time through 3D simulation and time-synchronized data playback by developing programs in an integrated development environment, increases machine performance with a centralized control of secure communication on globally open industrial protocols, and ensures the relevancy of non-intrusive data collection methods to quickly increase OEE as well as to build the foundation for future artificial intelligence algorithms.

Thomas Kuckhoff

Thomas Kuckhoff

Product Manager – Controllers and Industrial PC’s Omron Automation America

8:00 AM - 8:45 AM
Room S401cd

Exploring Modularity in Robotics Work Cell Design

Evan Gonnerman, Product Portfolio Manager, Concept Systems, Inc.

Steve Strong, CEO, Concept Systems,Inc.

Topic(s): Automation Systems, Design & Integration Robotics: Applications, Systems & Innovations

Custom automation comes at a price. In the pursuit of efficiency, be it labor, cost, or cycle time gains, manufacturers look to robotics to offer unique robotic automation to solve today's hardest problems. While these systems often are the answer, the barrier to entry is high. Unforeseen costs like these add up: 

  • Protracted sales process
  • Prohibitive cost of value-add engineering
  • First build challenges and delays
  • Sustaining service and support

6-axis robotic arms bring a human-like actuating technology to a manufacturing space reliant on flexibility during production. However, the robot is just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to turnkey robotic design. Other design constraints include machine vision, end-of-arm-tooling, product induction, product removal, safety, layout design, operator interface, and fault recovery. The design and integration of all of these elements demand the support of a system integrator.
Because every manufacturer has a different product, with differing manufacturing parameters, tolerances, and processes, the robotic solution space tends to shift and vary from one implementation to the next. Modularity in the design process reduces the variability between implementations while providing a higher quality to the manufacturer. Core elements to consider in modular design for robotic work cells include the following:

  • Scoping:  The enemy of modular design is absolute completion. Modularity will only go as far as to encompass a subset of a particular solution space. By scoping the design to an achievable portion of the application space, the cultivation of continuous development is enabled and encouraged.
  • Building Blocks: Modular design is rooted in identifying core technological building blocks early and appropriately. These typically are tied to the intersection of a specific piece of technology and an application space. 
  • Interfaces: The special sauce of modularity is the clear definition and execution of component interfaces. An interface can look like a specification, a communication protocol, a physical relation between components, or a human operator. Modular design is completed by deliberately outlining key interfaces before a single line of code is written or a bracket is designed.

The concept will focus on design modularity and reuse concerning the following pieces of technology:

  • Safety: Safety is the foremost component of any automation solution but can have a level of subjectivity when proper standards are not documented/followed. Using modularity in safety design allows for continuous improvement, verification, and validation while minimizing customer costs.
  • Robotics: Industrial robotics offer a strong, modular technical building block for implementation in modern manufacturing. The use cases for robotics mirror the capabilities of repetitive labor-intensive processes with a focus on quality, repeatability, and uptime. Introducing modular design in the hardware and software design of robotic systems reduces end-customer costs while increasing time-to-production.
  • Machine Vision: By introducing machine vision to a robotic system, flexibility, and high-mix, low-volume production capabilities are introduced into a robotic system. Modularity in machine vision processes allows for cross-robot compatibility and commonality between the “eyes” of an automation solution.
Evan Gonnerman

Evan Gonnerman

Product Portfolio Manager Concept Systems, Inc.

Steve Strong

Steve Strong

CEO Concept Systems,Inc.

8:00 AM - 8:45 AM
Room S402a

How to Simplify Your Industrial IoT Through an Open Ecosystem

Ken Crawford, Sr. Director Automation, Weidmuller

Topic(s): Automation Systems, Design & Integration Getting Started with Automation

Open ecosystems connected in the cloud are the future of Industrial IoT and Automation. When it comes to the management of industrial devices, end users no longer need to rely on a single provider to ensure future resilience and ease of system migration.

End users and OEMs can explore new trends in connectivity that allow third-party applications and avoid being locked into proprietary software. New technologies can offer more independence, simplification, and a pathway to a fully integrated future.

Ken Crawford

Ken Crawford

Sr. Director Automation Weidmuller

8:00 AM - 8:45 AM
Room S402b

Industrial Cameras: Beyond the Limits of Smart Cameras

Frank Jakubec, Product Marketing Manager, Balluff Inc.

Topic(s): Machine Vision, Imaging & Inspection

New to industrial cameras or encountered limitations in your previous smart camera implementations? Whether you lack technical experience or are simply looking to refresh your knowledge, our course is tailored just for you. Join us on a journey through the fundamentals of industrial cameras, covering essential terminology, indispensable components, and potential pitfalls to be aware of. We'll delve into the critical aspects of industrial cameras, exploring key terms such as shutter, resolution, interfaces, and standard communication protocols, and why they hold significance. Additionally, we'll provide valuable insights on cost-saving strategies through smart solution choices. By the end of this course, attendees can expect to feel confident in their ability to comprehend and engage in discussions about industrial camera technology with integrators, customers, and suppliers.

Frank Jakubec

Frank Jakubec

Product Marketing Manager Balluff Inc.

9:00 AM - 11:00 AM
Room S404d

Participants will gain an understanding of techniques for creating systems that yield reliable and repeatable measurement results. Practices for proper calibration of imaging systems ranging from appropriate usage of targets to accurate algorithm deployment will be discussed.  How to manage images correctly to create repeatable results will be reviewed. Anyone who is developing metrology systems or having and need for accurate measurements will benefit from this curriculum. 

10:00 AM - 10:45 AM
Room S401ab

AI/Machine Learning Applications in Robotics

Matthew Jones, VP of US Sales and Operations, Micropsi Industries USA, Inc.

Topic(s): AI & Smart Automation Getting Started with Automation Robotics: Applications, Systems & Innovations

While robotics and AI have been major buzzwords in both the automation industry, but also in a larger scope over the last few years, many factories are still learning how to actually harness the power of AI to their advantage. In this presentation, Matt will share some basic definitions of "What is AI?" and share concrete examples of where AI can be used to make manufacturing businesses more productive, resilient, and adaptive to the future.

Matthew Jones

Matthew Jones

VP of US Sales and Operations Micropsi Industries USA, Inc.

10:00 AM - 10:45 AM
Room S402b

Closing the Workforce Skills Gap in Automation: Navigating the Digital Revolution

Gail Norris, Director of Siemens Digital Industries Learning Services, Siemens Industry, Inc.

Topic(s): AI & Smart Automation Automation Systems, Design & Integration

As digitalization technologies continue to revolutionize manufacturing, the demand for specialized skills in robotics, artificial intelligence, and industrial automation is at an all-time high. In this dynamic presentation, we delve into the critical aspects of workforce readiness, and how to address the skills gap by investing in training programs, upskilling initiatives, and educational partnerships that equip individuals with the automation-related skills necessary to meet the demands of the modern workforce. 

By participating in this educational session, you will:

  • Learn how to tailor a Strategic Workforce Plan for your organization's unique needs.
  • Understand the critical pieces of targeted assessments.
  • Acquire essential knowledge for building comprehensive technical learning plans.

Join us to enrich your understanding of workforce planning and development, empowering your organization to nurture talent effectively!

Gail Norris

Gail Norris

Director of Siemens Digital Industries Learning Services Siemens Industry, Inc.

10:00 AM - 10:45 AM
Room S401cd

Ecosystems - Unlocking Solutions via Partnerships

Robert Brodecki, Application Portfolio Manager, KUKA Robotics Corp

Topic(s): Robotics: Applications, Systems & Innovations The Business Of Automation

“Some people want to know how the watch is made, most just want to know what time it is.”

In my experience in the automation and manufacturing industry, this statement has held true. Most manufacturers care far more about you being able to tell them what time it is compared to explaining how the clock works – the solution, not a product.  Currently, that is increasingly important as manufacturers look to automate more and more complicated tasks.

Automation has always been a combination of components – generally hardware with PLC or robot programming managing the system and different components. This isn’t the case anymore – now you have all the same pieces of hardware but with the addition of powerful software, including “AI.” Software is usually driving these systems. Now all the traditional automation suppliers have a big question to ask themselves – do they become software companies, too? Or do they focus on their key areas of hardware and find the right partners for the software side?

This isn’t really a new question – a strong robot company might not want to invest in end-of-arm tooling. A strong control company doesn’t want to invest in mechatronics. This is before we get into the conveyors, sensors, safety systems, and beyond.

Now that we’ve entered the age of software and AI, deciding on your core technologies and finding the right partners is more important than ever. Software moves so quickly, and for a traditional automation company to try and match what smaller, more agile teams can do requires large investments and complete re-designs of how business is done. If that’s not an option, then you’ve got to find the right partners.

This comes with its own set of questions that must be considered –

  • What are our core technologies and what do we need partners for?
  • What companies provide solutions for what we need from a partner standpoint?
  • Do we already provide sufficient interfaces for partners to properly incorporate their solutions, or do we need to develop these? What features do these interfaces need?
  • Do we need to open more of our IP to allow partners better integration?  Where do we draw the line?
  • What is our go-to-market plan with our partners?  
  • How do we promote offerings together?

All these topics must be considered and more, including legal structures, R&D partnerships, and beyond. It’s the same for the smaller software and AI companies, too – who are the big players to partner with to find success? How can you convince them to open their interfaces and equipment so you can fully integrate? 

The 21st century is full of automation finding its way into more places, from retail floors to fast-food kitchens. These solutions are all a combination of solid hardware with strong software, often in connection with vision and other sensor inputs. The companies best poised to take advantage of all the investment in these fields will be the ones that leverage their core technologies with partner technologies to create holistic solutions.

Robert Brodecki

Robert Brodecki

Application Portfolio Manager KUKA Robotics Corp

10:00 AM - 10:45 AM
Room S402a

Multi-Robot Coordinated Motion

John Wen, Professor and Head, Electrical, Computer, & Systems Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

Topic(s): Robotics: Applications, Systems & Innovations

Demanding industrial applications from cold spraying to additive manufacturing are increasingly deploying multiple robots in a coordinated fashion. For cold spray coating, leading industry deployment involves a dual-robot system, where one robot holds the part and the second robot holds the spray gun to impinge metal powders onto the part. For wire-arc additive manufacturing (WAAM), the welding robot, the positioner, and the metrology inspection robots all need to be coordinated to ensure high-quality end products. This talk will discuss issues and the latest advances that arise in such coordinated operation of multiple industrial robots, including: 

  • Overall control architecture integrating sensors and robots from different vendors.
  • Kinematics calibration of multiple robots.
  • Redundancy resolution.
  • Tracking accuracy through motion adaptation and learning

Use case results for cold spraying and WAAM using ABB, FANUC, and Motoman robots will be presented.

John Wen

John Wen

Professor and Head, Electrical, Computer, & Systems Engineering Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

2:00 PM - 4:30 PM
Room S404d

Advanced Image Processing

David Zerkler, Machine Vision Senior Learning Advisor, Zebra

Topic(s): Machine Vision, Imaging & Inspection

The ability to correctly analyze and classify details and particles in an image can be critical to the success of an imaging application.  Strategies around thresholding, advanced morphology and the correct usage of particle filters will be covered.  Additional topics include training strategies, images transforms, and image filtering.

David Zerkler

David Zerkler

Machine Vision Senior Learning Advisor Zebra

Friday, May 10, 2024
8:00 AM - 10:00 AM
Room S404d

Advanced Vision System Integration

David Dechow, Owner, Machine Vision Source

Robert Tait, Partner, Optical Metrology Solutions

Topic(s): Machine Vision, Imaging & Inspection

Producing a reliable vision system is no accident. It begins with creating a strong specification that carries through from component selection to system development and finally on-line deployment. Successful and efficient vision systems integration in an automation environment can be achieved by following a general well-accepted workflow that will guide the execution of each phase of the process. It’s important also to be able to identify certain classic integration challenges that may happen along the way.  This course will take you through the steps needed to achieve vision system integration success and will detail practical examples of typical use cases and the annoying but sometimes-amusing pitfalls that can (and will) occur.

David Dechow

David Dechow

Owner Machine Vision Source

Robert Tait

Robert Tait

Partner Optical Metrology Solutions

1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
Room S404d

Additional fee required for exam